James R. Webb (writer)

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
For the judo expert, see James R. Webb. For other persons named James Webb, see James Webb.
James R. Webb
Born (1909-10-04)October 4, 1909
Denver, Colorado, US
Died September 28, 1974(1974-09-28) (aged 64)
Beverly Hills, California, US
Occupation Writer, Screenwriter

James R. Webb (October 4, 1909 – September 28, 1974) was an American writer. He won an Academy Award in 1963 for How the West Was Won.[1]

Webb was born in Denver, Colorado, and graduated from Stanford University in 1930. During the 1930s he worked both as a screenwriter and a fiction writer for a number of national magazines, including Collier's Weekly, Cosmopolitan and the Saturday Evening Post.

Webb was commissioned an army officer in June 1942 and became a personal aide to General Lloyd R. Fredendall who was commander of the II Corps (United States). Webb accompanied Fredendall to England in October 1942 and participated in the invasion of North Africa in November 1942 when the Second Corps captured the city of Oran. The Second Corps then attacked eastward into Tunisia. In February 1943 the German army launched a counterattack at Kasserine Pass which repulsed the Second Corps and nearly broke through the Allied lines. The Supreme Commander Dwight D. Eisenhower relieved Fredendall of command in March 1943 and sent him back to the United States where he became deputy commander of the Second United States Army at Memphis, Tennessee.

Webb returned to the United States with Fredendall and later served in the European Theater. Webb left the Army after the war and returned to Hollywood, California, where he continued his work as a screenwriter. He died on September 27, 1974.

Partial filmography[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "JAMES WEBB DIES; SCREENWRITER, 64". The New York Times. September 29, 1974. p. 57. 

External links[edit]