James Stanhope, 7th Earl Stanhope

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
The Right Honourable
The Earl Stanhope
KG DSO MC PC
Stanhope7.JPG
First Commissioner of Works
In office
16 June 1936 – 27 May 1937
Monarch Edward VIII
George VI
Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin
Preceded by Hon. William Ormsby-Gore
Succeeded by Sir Philip Sassoon, Bt
President of the Board of Education
In office
28 May 1937 – 27 October 1938
Monarch George VI
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain
Preceded by Hon. Oliver Stanley
Succeeded by The Earl De La Warr
Leader of the House of Lords
In office
21 February 1938 – 14 May 1940
Monarch George VI
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain
Preceded by The Viscount Halifax
Succeeded by The Viscount Caldecote
First Lord of the Admiralty
In office
27 October 1938 – 3 September 1939
Monarch George VI
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain
Preceded by Duff Cooper
Succeeded by Winston Churchill
Lord President of the Council
In office
3 September 1939 – 10 May 1940
Monarch George VI
Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain
Preceded by The Viscount Runciman of Doxford
Succeeded by Neville Chamberlain
Personal details
Born (1880-11-11)11 November 1880
Died 15 August 1967(1967-08-15) (aged 86)
Nationality British
Political party Conservative
Spouse(s) Lady Eileen Browne
(1889–1940)

James Richard Stanhope, 13th Earl of Chesterfield and 7th Earl Stanhope, KG DSO MC PC (11 November 1880 – 15 August 1967), styled Viscount Mahon until 1905, and known as The Earl Stanhope from 1905 until 1967, was a British Conservative politician.

Background[edit]

Stanhope was the eldest son of Arthur Stanhope, 6th Earl Stanhope, and Evelyn Henrietta (née Pennefather), daughter of Richard Pennefather of Knockeevan, County Tipperary and Lady Emily Butler. The Hon. Edward Stanhope and Philip Stanhope, 1st Baron Weardale, were his uncles.[1]

Political career[edit]

Stanhope entered the House of Lords on the death of his father in 1905, and made his maiden speech in November 1909.[2] He held his first office as Parliamentary Secretary to the War Office under David Lloyd George between 1918 and 1919. In 1924 he was appointed Civil Lord of the Admiralty under Stanley Baldwin, a post he held until the Conservatives lost power in 1929. The latter year he was also sworn of the Privy Council.[3] After the formation of the National Government in 1931 he served under Ramsay MacDonald as Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty in 1931, as Under-Secretary of State for War between 1931 and 1934 and as Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs, the last year under the premiership of Stanley Baldwin. In 1934 he was made a Knight of the Garter.

He entered the cabinet in June 1936 when Baldwin appointed him First Commissioner of Works. When Neville Chamberlain became Prime Minister in May 1938 Stanhope was made President of the Board of Education, and in February 1938 he also succeeded Lord Halifax as Leader of the House of Lords. In October 1938 he became First Lord of the Admiralty while continuing as Leader of the House of Lords. After the outbreak of the Second World War in September 1939, he was succeeded as First Lord of the Admiralty by Winston Churchill and appointed Lord President of the Council. He remained as Leader of the House of Lords and Lord President until Churchill became Prime Minister in 1940. However, he did not serve in the Churchill coalition government and never returned to ministerial office. He made his last speech in the House of Lords in December 1960.[2]

Family[edit]

Lord Stanhope married Lady Eileen (1889–1940), the eldest daughter of George Browne, 6th Marquess of Sligo, and Agatha Stewart Hodgson, granddaughter of William Fortsyth. They had no children. She died in September 1940, aged 51. In 1952 Stanhope succeeded his kinsman the 12th Earl of Chesterfield as 13th Earl of Chesterfield and 7th Baron Stanhope, but never used the more senior earldom of Chesterfield, and continued to be known as The Earl Stanhope. Lord Stanhope died in August 1967, aged 86. On his death the earldoms and the barony of Stanhope became extinct, whereas the viscountcy of Stanhope of Mahon and the barony of Stanhope of Elvaston passed to his nearest heir, the 11th Earl of Harrington.[1] Lord Stanhope left his country seat Chevening to the nation.

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Frank Hodges
Civil Lord of the Admiralty
1924–1929
Succeeded by
George Hall
Preceded by
Charles Ammon
Parliamentary and Financial Secretary to the Admiralty
1931
Succeeded by
Lord Stanley
Preceded by
Vacant
Under-Secretary of State for War
1931–1934
Succeeded by
The Lord Strathcona and Mount Royal
Preceded by
Anthony Eden
Under-Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs
1934–1936
With: Viscount Cranborne (1935–1936)
Succeeded by
The Earl of Plymouth
Preceded by
Hon. William Ormsby-Gore
First Commissioner of Works
1936–1937
Succeeded by
Sir Philip Sassoon, Bt
Preceded by
Hon. Oliver Stanley
President of the Board of Education
1937–1938
Succeeded by
The Earl De La Warr
Preceded by
The Viscount Halifax
Leader of the House of Lords
1938–1940
Succeeded by
The Viscount Caldecote
Preceded by
Duff Cooper
First Lord of the Admiralty
1938–1939
Succeeded by
Winston Churchill
Preceded by
The Viscount Runciman of Doxford
Lord President of the Council
1939–1940
Succeeded by
Neville Chamberlain
Party political offices
Preceded by
The Viscount Halifax
Leader of the Conservative Party in the House of Lords
1938–1940
Succeeded by
The Viscount Caldecote
Peerage of England
Preceded by
Edward Scudamore-Stanhope
Earl of Chesterfield
1952–1967
Extinct
Peerage of Great Britain
Preceded by
Arthur Philip Stanhope
Earl Stanhope
1905–1967
Extinct
Viscount Stanhope of Mahon
1905–1967
Succeeded by
William Stanhope