Victor Gbeho

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James Victor Gbeho (born 12 January 1935, in Keta, Ghana) is a prominent Ghanaian lawyer and diplomat who has been President of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) Commission since 2010, to which position he was unanimously elected at the 37th Summit of the Authority of Heads of State and Government of the 15 Member States.[1] He was Ghana's Minister of Foreign Affairs from 1997 to 2001, under President Jerry Rawlings, and he was the Member of Parliament for the Anlo constituency from January 2001 to January 2005. He was subsequently a foreign policy advisor to the government of President John Atta Mills.

Before his retirement as a career diplomat and politician, Gbeho worked in the Ghana Foreign and Commonwealth Service and served in various capacities at Ghana's diplomatic missions abroad. His postings included the Ghana missions in China, India, Nigeria, Germany, United Kingdom and Switzerland.

Gbeho was Deputy High Commissioner to the Court of St. James's (UK) from 1972 until 1976, Ambassador and Permanent Representative of Ghana to the European offices of the United Nations in Geneva (1978–80), with concurrent accreditation to UNIDO in Vienna, Austria,[2] and was Ghana's Permanent Representative to the United Nations in New York from 1980 to 1990,[3] concurrently accredited to Cuba, Jamaica, and to Trinidad and Tobago. In July 1994, the UN Secretary-General appointed him as special representative to Somalia.[4] In September 1995 Jerry Rawlings, as chairman of ECOWAS, appointed Gbeho as ECOWAS special representative for Liberia.[5]

He is the son of Philip Gbeho, arranger of the national anthem of Ghana, and the uncle of journalist Komla Dumor.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Ambassador Victor Gbeho, New President of Ecowas Commission, Assumes Duty", AllAfrica.
  2. ^ Ambassador James Victor Gbeho profile.
  3. ^ "Permanent Mission of Ghana to the United Nations - Past Ambassadors". United Nations. Retrieved 2011-02-23. 
  4. ^ UNITED NATIONS OPERATION IN SOMALIA II.
  5. ^ Adekeye Adebajo, Liberia's civil war: Nigeria, ECOMOG, and regional security in West Africa, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2002, pp. 182-3.

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Kwamena Ahwoi
Foreign Minister
1997 – 2001
Succeeded by
Hackman Owusu-Agyeman
Preceded by
Mohamed Ibn Chambas
President of the ECOWAS Commission
2010–2012
Succeeded by
Kadré Désiré Ouedraogo
Parliament of Ghana
Preceded by
Squadron Leader Clend M. Sowu
Member of Parliament for Anlo
2001 – 2005
Succeeded by
Clement Kofi Humado
Diplomatic posts
Preceded by
Van H. Sekyi
Permanent Representatives to the United Nations
1980 – 1990
Succeeded by
George Lamptey