Jamie Baker (ice hockey)

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For other people named James Baker, see James Baker (disambiguation).
Jamie Baker
Born (1966-08-31) August 31, 1966 (age 48)
Nepean, ON, CAN
Height 6 ft 1 in (185 cm)
Weight 190 lb (86 kg; 13 st 8 lb)
Position Centre
Shot Left
Played for Quebec Nordiques
Ottawa Senators
San Jose Sharks
Toronto Maple Leafs
NHL Draft 1988 NHL Supplemental Draft
Quebec Nordiques
Playing career 1989–1999

James Paul Baker (born August 31, 1966) is a Canadian former hockey player, having played for the Quebec Nordiques, Ottawa Senators, San Jose Sharks and Toronto Maple Leafs, and the former radio personality for the San Jose Sharks was announced as the new television color commentator on August 27, 2014. He was selected by the Quebec Nordiques in the 1988 NHL Supplemental Draft.

Playing career[edit]

As a player, Baker is best known for scoring the series-winning goal for the San Jose Sharks in the seventh game of the 1994 Western Conference Quarterfinals against the heavily favored Detroit Red Wings. Following an outstanding college career with the St. Lawrence University Skating Saints, Baker went on to play in parts of 10 NHL seasons. In 404 career games, he tallied 71 goals and 150 points. Baker also appeared in 25 Stanley Cup playoff games.

In 2005–06, he returned to the San Jose Sharks to join Dan Rusanowsky and David Maley on the Sharks' radio broadcast team. Baker would call most games with Rusanowsky, although he would occasionally be replaced by Maley when sent on assignments for the organization. On a number of occasions, Baker and Maley joined Rusanowsky in a popular "triple-cast" format. Beginning with the 2008–09 season, Baker also hosts pre-game and post-game shows for Sharks games on Comcast SportsNet Bay Area.

Baker was also a co-coach of the Santa Clara Blackhawks CAHA state championship winning Bantam A team for the 2009-2010 season.

Baker is tied with Jeff Friesen for the Sharks single-season short-handed goals record with 6, set in his 1995-96 season during which he scored 16 total goals.[1]

Career statistics[edit]

    Regular season   Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1985–86 St. Lawrence University NCAA 31 9 16 25 52
1986–87 St. Lawrence University NCAA 32 8 24 32 59
1987–88 St. Lawrence University NCAA 38 26 28 54 44
1988–89 St. Lawrence University NCAA 13 11 16 27 16
1989–90 Halifax Citadels AHL 74 17 43 60 47 6 0 0 0 7
1989–90 Quebec Nordiques NHL 1 0 0 0 0
1990–91 Halifax Citadels AHL 50 14 22 36 85
1990–91 Quebec Nordiques NHL 18 2 0 2 8
1991–92 Halifax Citadels AHL 9 5 0 5 12
1991–92 Quebec Nordiques NHL 52 7 10 17 32
1992–93 Ottawa Senators NHL 76 19 29 48 54
1993–94 San Jose Sharks NHL 65 12 5 17 38 14 3 2 5 30
1994–95 San Jose Sharks NHL 43 7 4 11 22 11 2 2 4 12
1995–96 San Jose Sharks NHL 77 16 17 33 79
1996–97 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 58 8 8 16 28
1997–98 Chicago Wolves IHL 53 11 34 45 80 22 4 5 9 42
1997–98 Toronto Maple Leafs NHL 13 0 5 5 10
1998–99 San Jose Sharks NHL 1 0 1 1 0
1998–99 HIFK SM-l 11 1 5 6 22
NHL Totals 404 71 79 150 271 25 5 4 9 42

References[edit]

External links[edit]