Jan Fredrik Wiborg

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Jan Fredrik Wiborg (9 October 1944 – 21 June 1994) was a Norwegian civil engineer.[1]

During the early 1990s, he criticised plans for building Oslo's new airport at Gardermoen. The Parliament of Norway had originally decided to build the new airport at Hurumlandet, but weather surveys claimed this location would only be operable 80% of the time. Wiborg claimed the information was falsified and that parliament were deliberately misled by government officials.[citation needed]

Wiborg died on 21 June 1994 after falling from a hotel window in Copenhagen, and crucial documents about the case disappeared. Circumstances about his death was never fully cleared. Journalists from the newspaper Aftenposten were awarded the prestigious SKUP prize in 1999 for their investigation of the case.[2][3]

In 2000 the parliamentary Standing Committee on Scrutiny and Constitutional Affairs held a public hearing about the alleged foul play during the airport planning process. An official report was released in 2001.[4][5]

Family[edit]

Jan Fredrik Wiborg had a son, Daniel Wiborg. Daniel is a civil engineer in aerospace industry.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Rapport til Stortinget / Hvem var Jan Fredrik Wiborg?" (in Norwegian). The Norwegian Parliament. Retrieved 17 May 2008. 
  2. ^ The Norwegian Institute of Journalism. "SKUP Prize 1999" (in Norwegian). Archived from the original on 24 March 2007. Retrieved 25 February 2007. 
  3. ^ Pål Enghaug et al. "Wiborg and the Gardermoen weather report" (in Norwegian). Retrieved 25 February 2007. 
  4. ^ whistleblowers.dk. "The political plotting of an airport". Retrieved 25 February 2007. 
  5. ^ California Aviation Alliance. "Norwegian airport probe says court of impeachment must be considered". Retrieved 25 February 2007.