Jan Smeterlin

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Jan Čeperlin (7 February 1892 in Bielsko, Austro-Hungarian Empire – 18 January 1967 in London[1]) was a Polish concert pianist. He is especially known as an interpreter of Frédéric Chopin and Karol Szymanowski.[2][3]

Life[edit]

Čeperlin performed his first concert at age seven, but despite exhibiting talent in his youth, he was forced to study law. He won a scholarship to study with pianist Leopold Godowsky while studying in Vienna, Austria. Godowsky was to be one of Smeterlin’s most important teachers. Čeperlin made his professional debut in 1920.[4]

Čeperlin was a cooking enthusiast and authored a book of recipes. The book was published posthumously. In his later years, Smeterlin and Didi, his wife, lived in New York. Shortly after the couple returned to London in 1967, Smeterlin died.[5]

Szymanowski[edit]

Over the course of his career, Smeterlin maintained a close relationship with Polish composer Karol Szymanowski. The two were both colleagues and friends, and Szymanowski dedicated of a volume of mazureks to Smeterlin and later published the pair’s letters to each other. Smeterlin frequently performed Szymanowski's works. [6]

Recordings[edit]

Smeterlin recorded more music of Chopin than of any other composer. Over his career, Smeterlin recorded for the Philips, Mace, Allegro, Polydor, and RCA Victor recording labels.[7]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Baker's Biographical Dictionary of Musicians, Seventh Edition, Revised by Nicolas Slonimsky, Schirmer Books, New York, 1984, page 2151.
  2. ^ The International Piano Archives at The University of Maryland, biographical description with collection
  3. ^ The New York Times, obituary, "Jan Čeperlin, Pianist, 74, Dead," January 20, 1967, page 37
  4. ^ The International Piano Archives at The University of Maryland, biographical description with collection
  5. ^ The International Piano Archives at the University of Maryland, biographical description with collection.
  6. ^ "Correspondence and Essays," by Karol Szymanowski, Jan Smeterlin, B. M. Maciejewski, Felix Aprahamian, Allegro Press, 1969
  7. ^ The International Piano Archives at The University of Maryland, biographical description with collection