Jan de Quay

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Jan de Quay
Jan de Quay 1962b.jpg
Jan de Quay in 1962
Prime Minister of the Netherlands
In office
May 19, 1959 – July 24, 1963
Monarch Juliana
Preceded by Louis Beel
Succeeded by Victor Marijnen
Minister of Transport and Water Management
In office
November 22, 1966 – April 5, 1967
Prime Minister Jelle Zijlstra
Preceded by Ko Suurhoff
Succeeded by Joop Bakker
Deputy Prime Minister
In office
November 22, 1966 – April 5, 1967
Serving with Barend Biesheuvel
Prime Minister Jelle Zijlstra
Preceded by Anne Vondeling
Succeeded by Johan Witteveen
Member of the Senate
In office
June 25, 1963 – November 22, 1966
Member of the Senate
In office
June 13, 1967 – September 16, 1969
Minister of Defence
In office
August 1, 1959 – September 4, 1959
Prime Minister Jan de Quay
Preceded by Sidney J. van den Bergh
Succeeded by Sim Visser
Queen's Commissioner of North Brabant
In office
November 1, 1946 – May 19, 1959
Monarch Wilhelmina (1946-1948)
Juliana (1948-1959)
Preceded by Johannes van Oyen
Succeeded by Constant Kortmann
Minister of War
In office
April 4, 1945 – June 24, 1945
Prime Minister Pieter Sjoerds Gerbrandy
Preceded by Jim de Booy
Succeeded by Jo Meynen
Personal details
Born Jan Eduard de Quay
(1901-08-26)August 26, 1901
's-Hertogenbosch, Netherlands
Died July 4, 1985(1985-07-04) (aged 83)
Beers, Netherlands
Nationality Dutch
Political party Roman-Catholic State Party (for 1945)
Catholic People's Party (1945-1980)
Spouse(s) Maria van der Lande (1901-1988)
Alma mater Utrecht University (PhD)
Occupation Politician
Professor
Psychologist
Religion Roman Catholic

Jan Eduard de Quay (August 26, 1901 – July 4, 1985) was a Dutch politician of the defunct Catholic People's Party (KVP) now merged into the Christian Democratic Appeal (CDA). He served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from May 19, 1959 until July 24, 1963.

He previously served as Minister of War from April 4, 1945 until June 24, 1945 in the Cabinet Gerbrandy III. He became Queen's Commissioner of North Brabant serving from November 1, 1946 until May 19, 1959. After the Dutch general election of 1959, de Quay became Prime Minister of the Netherlands, leading the Cabinet De Quay. And as acting Minister of Defence from August 1, 1959 until September 4, 1959 following the resignation of Sidney J. van den Bergh.

After his premiership, De Quay remained in active politics and became a Member of the Senate from June 25, 1963 until November 22, 1966 when he became Minister of Transport and Water Management and Deputy Prime Minister in the caretaker Cabinet Zijlstra serving from November 22, 1966 until April 5, 1967. He became again a Member of the Senate serving from June 13, 1967 until September 16, 1969.[1]

Biography[edit]

Early life[edit]

Jan Eduard de Quay was born in 's-Hertogenbosch on August 26, 1901. After attending a Jesuit school in Katwijk, he graduated in psychology from the University of Utrecht in 1926. The following year he was awarded a doctorate for his thesis on the contribution of sensory and motor factors to the learning and labour process.

In 1928 he was appointed lecturer in psychotechnology at the Catholic college of higher education in Tilburg (now the University of Tilburg) and in 1933 professor of business economics and psychotechnology at the same institution. During the pre-war mobilisation of the Netherlands (1939-1940) De Quay became a lieutenant in the reserve. In July 1940 he formed the Triumvirate of the controversial nationalist Dutch Union with Louis Einthoven and Hans Linthorst Homan. This Union was controversial because its leaders suggested partial collaboration with the German occupiers. In August 1940 De Quay started secret meetings with the fascistic Nationaal Front in oder to fuse the two organisations. During these talks De Quay called himself a fascist, the Union a fascistic organisation and said that he rejected democracy.[2] In May and June of the same year he was government commissioner for labour at the Ministry of Social Affairs. In this position he encouraged the Dutch population to seek employment in Germany. From July 1942 to June 1943 he was interned in Haaren, after which he went into hiding from the occupation authorities. This lasted until June 1943, when he went into hiding. Following the liberation of the area south of the rivers in late 1944, he became chairman of the Board of Commissioners for Agriculture, Industry, Trade and Commerce set up to restore the national economy.

Politics[edit]

From April 5 until June 23, 1945, De Quay was Minister of War in the Cabinet Gerbrandy II. On November 1, 1946 he became Queen's Commissioner of North Brabant until May 19, 1959. He served as Prime Minister of the Netherlands from May 19, 1959 until July 24, 1963. He served as a Member of the Senate from June 25, 1963 until November 22, 1966. During the Cabinet Zijlstra he served as Minister of Transport, Public Works and Water Management and Deputy Prime Minister from November 22, 1966 until April 5, 1967. On June 13, 1967 he again was a Member of the Senate until September 16, 1969.

Trivia[edit]

De Quay died on July 4, 1985 in Beers, he was 83.[3]

Decorations[edit]

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Government offices
Preceded by
Jim de Booy
Minister of War
1945
Succeeded by
Jo Meynen
Preceded by
Sidney J. van den Bergh
Minister of Defence
1959
Succeeded by
Sim Visser
Preceded by
Louis Beel
Minister of General Affairs
1959-1963
Succeeded by
Victor Marijnen
Preceded by
Ko Suurhoff
Minister of Transport and Water Management
1966-1967
Succeeded by
Joop Bakker
Political offices
Preceded by
Johannes van Oyen
Queen's Commissioner of North Brabant
1946-1959
Succeeded by
Constant Kortmann
Preceded by
Louis Beel
Prime Minister of the Netherlands
1959-1963
Succeeded by
Victor Marijnen