Jane Kramer

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Jane Kramer (born August 7, 1938) is an American journalist who is the European correspondent for The New Yorker; she has written a regular "Letter from Europe" for twenty years. Kramer has also written nine books, the latest of which, Lone Patriot (2003), is about a militia in the American West. Her other books include The Last Cowboy, Europeans and The Politics of Memory.

In Last Cowboy and Lone Patriot she explored downward mobility in America.[1]

Biography[edit]

Kramer was born in Providence, Rhode Island. She has a B.A. in English from Vassar College and an M.A. in English from Columbia University.

For the first paperback edition of The Last Cowboy, Kramer received a 1981 National Book Award for Nonfiction.[2][a]

Her other awards include an Emmy Award for documentary filmmaking, National Magazine Award, Front Page Award, and the Prix européen de l'essai Charles Veillon (fr).

Kramer is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a member of the Council on Foreign Relations and a founding director of the Committee to Protect Journalists. She has taught at Princeton University, Sarah Lawrence, CUNY, and the University of California, Berkeley.

Since 2006, Kramer has been a Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur.

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Lone Patriot: The Short Career of an American Militiaman, Random House, 2002
  • The Politics of Memory: Looking for Germany in the New Germany, Random House, 1996
  • Unter Deutschen, Edition Tiamat (Berlin), 1996
  • Whose Art Is It, Duke University Press, 1994
  • Sonderbare Europäer, Die Andere Bibliothek/Eichborn (Frankfurt), 1993
  • Eine Amerikanerin in Berlin, Edition Tiamat (Berlin), 1993
  • Europeans, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1988
  • Unsettling Europe, Random House, 1980
  • The Last Cowboy, Harper & Row, 1977
  • Honor to the Bride Like the Pigeon That Guards Its Grain Under the Clove Tree, Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1970
  • Allen Ginsberg in America, Random House, 1969
  • Off Washington Square: A Reporter Looks at Greenwich Village, N.Y., Duell, Sloan & Pierce, 1963

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ This was the award for paperback "General Nonfiction".
    From 1980 to 1983 in National Book Awards history there were several nonfiction subcategories including General Nonfiction, with dual hardcover and paperback awards in most categories. Most of the paperback award-winners were reprints, including this one.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jane Kramer". Robert S. Boynton. The New New Journalism. Retrieved 2012-03-11.
  2. ^ "National Book Awards – 1981". National Book Foundation. Retrieved 2012-03-11.

External links[edit]