Janet D. Spector

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Janet D. Spector (October 21, 1944 – September 13, 2011) was an American archaeologist. She is known for her contributions to the archaeology of gender and ethnoarchaeology.[1][2] She is the author of What This Awl Means: Feminist Archaeology at a Wahpeton Dakota Village,[3] a book which combines Spector's autobiography with the excavation of the Little Rapids site (also known as Inyan Ceyaka Otonwe) in Scott County, Minnesota and a fictional story of a young Dakota woman who lived in the village. While a professor at the University of Minnesota, Spector helped found the women's studies program at the university, and chaired the program from 1981 to 1984[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 10,000 Books Weblog : Minnesota Historical Society Press » Janet D. Spector (1944–2011), In Memoriam
  2. ^ Thomas, David Hurst and Robert L. Kelly (2006). Archaeology. Thomson Wadsworth. ISBN 0-15-505899-1.
  3. ^ Spector, Janet (1993). What This Awl Means: Feminist Archaeology at a Wahpeton Dakota Village. Minnesota Historical Society Press. ISBN 0-87351-277-4. 
  4. ^ Janet Spector has died - College of Liberal Arts E-News