Janet McDonald

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Janet McDonald
Born (1953-08-10)August 10, 1953
Brooklyn, United States
Died April 11, 2007(2007-04-11) (aged 53)
Paris, France
Occupation Attorney, Author
Genre Young adult fiction, Memoir

Janet McDonald (August 10, 1953 - April 11, 2007)[1] was an American writer of young adult novels as well as the author of Project Girl, a memoir about her early life in the Brooklyn projects and struggle to achieve an Ivy League education. Her best known children's book is Spellbound, which tells the story of a teenaged mother who wins a spelling competition and a college scholarship. The book was named as the American Library Association's Best Book for Young Adults in 2002.[2]

In addition to books, McDonald also wrote articles for publications such as Slate, including one in which she paid psychic Sylvia Browne $700 for a telephone reading.[3] McDonald was a member of Mensa, the high IQ society.[4][5]

After graduating from Vassar (1977), Columbia University (1984), and New York University (1986), McDonald practiced law in New York City (1986-1989) and Seattle (1989-1991).[6] She took a position as an intern at a Paris law firm (1991-1993) before moving to Olympia, Washington to work in the Attorney General's office and teach French language classes at Evergreen State College.[7] McDonald settled in Paris in 1995 to work first as an international attorney and then as a writer, until she died of cancer in 2007.[8]

Bibliography[edit]

Books[edit]

Articles[edit]

  • McDonald, Janet (Nov–Dec 2005). "Up the Down Staircase: Where Snoop and Shakespeare Meet". Horn Book Magazine 81 (6): 747–750. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 
  • McDonald, Janet (Fall 2003). "X-Patriate". Literary Review 47 (1): 58–62. 
  • McDonald, Janet (Summer 2002). "Double Life". Literary Review 45 (4): 679–685. 
  • McDonald, Janet (Jan 1999). "Educating Janet". Teacher Magazine 10 (4): 46–52. 
  • McDonald, Janet (15 Feb 2002). "Booklist Interview". Booklist 98 (12): 1026. 
  • McDonald, Janet (May 1994). "A Sister in Paris". Essence 25 (1): 54. 
  • McDonald, Janet (8 Jan 2003). "Crystal bawl". Slate. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 
  • McDonald, Janet (24 Aug 1998). "Black like (white) me". Slate. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 
  • McDonald, Janet (4 Feb 1999). "A dime bag for the schoolgirl". Slate. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 
  • McDonald, Janet (16 Jan 2001). "Project Girls". The Village Voice. Retrieved 25 June 2014. 

Quotes[edit]

  • "Freedom is ... not about nothing left to lose, its about nothing left to be; you don't have to be anything."[9]
  • "Paris is where I became possible. It's where I became free."[10]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Ross-Stroud, Catherine (2009). Janet McDonald: The Original Project Girl. Scarecrow Press. p. 1. 
  2. ^ "2002 Best Books for Young Adults". American Library Association. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 
  3. ^ "Articles by Janet McDonald". Slate. Retrieved 21 May 2014. 
  4. ^ Powers, Retha (2007). "Janet McDonald 1953-2007: make some noise for the Project Girl". Black Issues Book Review. 
  5. ^ Project Girl, page 183, 1st ed.
  6. ^ Ross-Stroud, Catherine (2009). Janet McDonald: The Original Project Girl. Scarecrow Press. pp. xi–xii. 
  7. ^ Ross-Stroud, Catherine (2009). Janet McDonald: The Original Project Girl. Scarecrow Press. pp. xii. 
  8. ^ Ross-Stroud, Catherine (2009). Janet McDonald: The Original Project Girl. Scarecrow Press. pp. xii–xiii. 
  9. ^ Americans in Paris, a 2000 episode of This American Life, featuring McDonald
  10. ^ Powers, Retha (2007). "Janet McDonald 1953-2007: make some noise for the Project Girl". Black Issues Book Review. Retrieved 25 June 2014. 

Further reading[edit]

  • Catherine Ross-Stroud. "Urban Hip-Hop Fiction: Janet McDonald." Encyclopedia of Hip-Hop Literature, Ed. Tarshia Stanley. Greenwood Press, 2008.

External links[edit]