Janne Ahonen

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Janne Ahonen
Janne Ahonen 2 - WC Zakopane - 27-01-2008.JPG
Personal information
Full name Janne Petteri Ahonen
Born (1977-05-11) May 11, 1977 (age 37)
Lahti, Finland
Height 1.84 m
Professional information
Club Lahden Hiihtoseura
Skis Fischer
Personal best 233.5 m
World Cup
Seasons 1992–2008, 2009–2011, 2013–
Stage wins 36
Stage podiums 108
Updated on January 6, 2010.

Janne Petteri Ahonen (About this sound pronunciation ) (born May 11, 1977 in Lahti, Finland) is a Finnish ski jumper who competed in the World Cup between 1992 and 2011. He is often considered as one of the most successful athletes in the history of ski jumping.

Ahonen's most notable achievements include five World Championships (normal hill 1997, large hill 2005, team large hill 1995, 1997 and 2003), two World Cup overall victories (2002–2003 and 2004–2005) and a record-breaking five victories in the Four Hills Tournament (1998–1999, 2002–2003, 2004–2005, 2005–2006 and 2007–2008). He is the all-time leader in World Cup points, podiums (108) and Top 10 appearances (245). With 36 World Cup victories, Ahonen is the all-time fourth, behind Gregor Schlierenzauer, Matti Nykänen and Adam Małysz. In 2005, Ahonen was named the Finnish Sports Personality of the Year.

In 9 World Ski Championship Games, 9 Ski-Flying World Championship Games and 5 Olympic Games, Ahonen won a total of 19 medals, equalling the medal count of Matti Nykänen – although most of them are team, not individual. Despite his success, Ahonen has never won an individual Olympic medal, placing 4th three times. In Olympic team competitions, he won two silver medals.

Ahonen announced his retirement from ski jumping on March 28, 2008. His farewell competition was held in Lahti on July 9, 2008.

After one season's absence, Ahonen came back for two more seasons, 2009–2010 and 2010–2011. The best achievement of Ahonen's revived career was the second place in the Four Hills Tournament in 2009–2010.

During his ski jumping career, Ahonen was known for his apparent lack of emotion and was rarely seen smiling even on the podium. When asked for a reason, he responded "We came here to jump and not to smile". In Finnish interviews Ahonen often made sarcastic comments with dry humour. The German press nicknamed Ahonen as "the Mask", according to the plastic mask Ahonen wore in competitions in the late 1990s. In Finland, Ahonen is often called "Kuningaskotka" ("The King Eagle").

On January 10, 2013, Ahonen announced that he would come out of retirement for the second time, with the aim of winning a medal in an individual event at the 2014 Winter Olympics.

Drag racing[edit]

In addition to ski jumping, Ahonen has successfully competed in drag racing winning Finnish and Nordic Championships. In 2006, Ahonen set the new European Record.

Personal life[edit]

Ahonen is married to Tiia Ahonen. They have two sons, Mico (born 2001) and Milo (born 2008).

Achievements[edit]

Winter Olympic Games[edit]

FIS Nordic World Ski Championships[edit]

Four Hills Tournament[edit]

FIS Ski Flying World Championships[edit]

Ski jumping World Cup[edit]

  • World Cup: 36 victories, 44 second places, 28 third places
  • Summer Grand Prix: 5 victories, 6 second places, 2 third places
  • Most podium positions of all jumpers (108)
  • Most world cup points of all jumpers
  • Six consecutive victories (ties the record with Matti Hautamäki, Thomas Morgenstern and Gregor Schlierenzauer)
  • Longest jump in the world at the time (fell on landing): 240 m (Planica 2005)

Overall rank[edit]

Official hill records[edit]

Date Hill Record
January 11, 2004 Liberec 139.0 m
December 12, 2004 Harrachov 145.5 m
December 18, 2004 Engelberg 141.0 m
January 9, 2005 Willingen 152.0 m

World cup victories[edit]

  1. Engelberg – December 19, 1993
  2. Garmisch-Partenkirchen – January 1, 1995
  3. Lillehammer – December 3, 1995
  4. Kulm – February 10, 1996
  5. Lahti – March 7, 1998
  6. Chamonix – December 6, 1998
  7. Harrachov (HS 142) – December 19, 1998
  8. Harrachov (HS 142) – December 20, 1998
  9. Engelberg – January 9, 1999
  10. Zakopane – January 17, 1999
  11. Harrachov (HS 142) – February 7, 1999
  12. Villach – December 12, 1999
  13. Lahti – March 4, 2000
  14. Engelberg – December 21, 2002
  15. Innsbruck – January 4, 2003
  16. Liberec – January 10, 2004
  17. Liberec – January 11, 2004
  18. Willingen – February 14, 2004
  19. Kuusamo – November 27, 2004
  20. Kuusamo – November 28, 2004
  21. Trondheim – December 4, 2004
  22. Trondheim – December 5, 2004
  23. Harrachov (HS 142) – December 12, 2004
  24. Engelberg – December 18, 2004
  25. Engelberg – December 19, 2004
  26. Oberstdorf (HS 137) – December 29, 2004
  27. Garmisch-Partenkirchen – January 1, 2005
  28. Innsbruck – January 3, 2005
  29. Willingen – January 9, 2005
  30. Titisee-Neustadt – January 22, 2005
  31. Oberstdorf (HS 137) – December 29, 2005
  32. Bischofshofen – January 6, 2006
  33. Bischofshofen (replaced: Innsbruck) – January 5, 2008
  34. Bischofshofen – January 6, 2008
  35. Harrachov (HS 205) – January 20, 2008
  36. Kuopio – March 4, 2008

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Olympic Games
Preceded by
Marja-Liisa Kirvesniemi
Flagbearer for  Finland
Nagano 1998
Succeeded by
Toni Nieminen