Jansug Kakhidze

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Jansug Kakhidze
Kachidze.jpg
Jansug Kachidze
Background information
Born (1935-05-26)May 26, 1935
Tblisi, Georgia
Died March 8, 2002(2002-03-08) (aged 66)
Genres Classical music, Symphony, Opera, Georgian contemporary music
Occupations Conductor, Music director
Years active 1957–2002
Associated acts Tbilisi Opera and Ballet Theatre, Georgian State Symphony Orchestra, Tbilisi Center for Music and Culture, Tbilisi Symphony Orchestra

Jansug Kakhidze (Georgian: ჯანსუღ კახიძე) (born 26 May 1935 in Tblisi, Georgia; died 8 March 2002) was a Georgian conductor, nicknamed "the Georgian Karajan". Kakhidze was music director of the Georgian State Symphony Orchestra for two decades beginning in 1973.[1] He is the father of composer and conductor Vakhtang Kakhidze.

Musical career[edit]

In 1958, Kakhidze graduated from the Choir Conducting department of the Tbilisi State Conservatory. In 1963 he completed the post-graduate courses for Opera and Symphony Orchestra Conducting under Professor Odysseas Dimitriadis at the same institution. Later he had training in Moscow with the Ukrainian/French conductor Igor Markevich.

From 1982 until 2002 Djansug Kakhidze was the Artistic Director and Chief Conductor of the Tbilisi Opera and Ballet Theatre. Opera performances released under his direction included Salome, Don Giovanni, Boris Goduno, Il trovatore, Otello, Rigoletto, Cavalleria rusticana, Gianni Schicchi, L'elisir d'amore, The Queen of Spades, The Fiery Angel, The Love for Three Oranges, Duenj, Abesalom and Eteri, and Music for the living.

In 1989, Kakhidze founded a new hall for symphony music in Tbilisi, which included the Tbilisi Center for Music and Culture. He established the first professional boys' choir in Tbilisi at this center in 2000, further developing the classical performing arts in Georgia.

In 1993, Kakhidze founded the new Tbilisi Symphony Orchestra, and led it until his death in 2002.

Noted for his innovative program and devotion to contemporary works from his homeland, Kakhidze gained recognition during his life as a close friend and strong advocate of composer Giya Kancheli, recording his entire cycle of seven symphonies along with many other works.

Highlights of Kakhidze's career included numerous appearances conducting throughout Europe and Australia. His performance of Berlioz's Damnation of Faust with the Orchestre de Paris in 1990 drew high praise from critics, and helped him to secure further international success in places such as the United States, where appeared as a guest conductor with both the Boston Symphony Orchestra and the National Symphony Orchestra.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Hill, Christopher (2008). "Jansug Kakhidze Conductor". Classical Archives. Classical Archives LLC — The Ultimate Classical Music Destination. Retrieved 16 January 2011. 

External links[edit]