January 1964

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1964 : January · February · March · April · May · June · July · August · September · October · November · December

The following events occurred in January, 1964.

January 1, 1964 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 2, 1964 (Thursday)[edit]

January 3, 1964 (Friday)[edit]

January 4, 1964 (Saturday)[edit]

January 5, 1964 (Sunday)[edit]

January 6, 1964 (Monday)[edit]

January 7, 1964 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • A British firm, the Leyland Motor Corp., announces the sale of 450 buses to the Cuban government, challenging the United States blockade of Cuba.
  • Born: Nicolas Cage, US actor (as Nicolas Kim Coppola), in Long Beach, California

January 8, 1964 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 9, 1964 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Martyrs' Day: Armed clashes between United States troops and Panamanian civilians in the Panama Canal Zone precipitate a major international crisis, resulting in the deaths of 21 Panamanians and 4 U.S. soldiers.

January 10, 1964 (Friday)[edit]

  • The T-class submarine HMS Tiptoe runs aground in the River Clyde at Greenock. It is refloated after seven hours.[6]
  • Introducing...the Beatles is released by Chicago's Vee-Jay Records to get the jump on Capitol Records' release of Meet the Beatles!, scheduled for January 20. The two record companies fight over Vee-Jay's release of this album in court.

January 11, 1964 (Saturday)[edit]

January 12, 1964 (Sunday)[edit]

January 13, 1964 (Monday)[edit]

January 14, 1964 (Tuesday)[edit]

January 15, 1964 (Wednesday)[edit]

  • Died: Tawfiq Canaan, 81, pioneering physician, medical researcher, ethnographer and Palestinian nationalist; Jack Teagarden, 58, US jazz trombonist (heart attack)

January 16, 1964 (Thursday)[edit]

January 17, 1964 (Friday)[edit]

January 18, 1964 (Saturday)[edit]

January 19, 1964 (Sunday)[edit]

January 20, 1964 (Monday)[edit]

January 21, 1964 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • President Léon M'ba of Gabon dissolves the country's legislature as an "economy measure".[10]

January 22, 1964 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 23, 1964 (Thursday)[edit]

  • Thirteen years after its proposal and nearly 2 years after its passage by the United States Senate, the 24th Amendment to the United States Constitution, prohibiting the use of poll taxes in national elections, is ratified.
  • In Jakarta, Indonesia and Malaysian leaders agree to a ceasefire. US Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy is involved in the negotiations.
  • Pope Paul VI institutes the World Day of Prayer for Vocations. It is being observed up to now. During this celebration the Popes remind the universal Church that still today salvation comes to us. It is celebrated every Fourth Sunday of Easter also known as Good Shepherd Sunday.
  • Arthur Miller's After the Fall opens on Broadway. A semi-autobiographical work, it arouses controversy over his portrayal of late ex-wife Marilyn Monroe.

January 24, 1964 (Friday)[edit]

January 25, 1964 (Saturday)[edit]

January 26, 1964 (Sunday)[edit]

  • The annual telecasts of The Wizard of Oz in the USA resume after being temporarily discontinued in 1963. The reason for the film's not being shown that year is not made public, but it is possible that it was because of the recent assassination of President John F. Kennedy. If the then-established pattern of Christmas-season showings of the film had continued in 1963, the movie would have had to be shown in early December, only two weeks after the President's death.

January 27, 1964 (Monday)[edit]

January 28, 1964 (Tuesday)[edit]

  • Families from Springtown Camp in Northern Ireland make a silent march through Derry to demand rehousing.[14]

January 29, 1964 (Wednesday)[edit]

January 30, 1964 (Thursday)[edit]

January 31, 1964 (Friday)[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ South African History Online. Accessed 12 December 2013
  2. ^ Ranter, Harro and Fabian I. Lujan. "ASN Aircraft accident Douglas C-124C Globemaster II 52-0968 Hawaii." Aviation Safety Network, 2009. Retrieved: 28 June 2011.
  3. ^ "TV50: The 1960s". TV50. RTÉ. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 
  4. ^ "Three Missing When Ship Sinks" The Times (London). Saturday, 4 January 1964. (55900), col C, p. 7.
  5. ^ "Belgian Merchant P-Z". Belgische Koopvaardij. Retrieved 1 December 2010. 
  6. ^ "Submarine Grounds in Clyde" The Times (London). Saturday, 11 January 1964. (55906), col B, p. 6.
  7. ^ McRobbie, Angela (1991). Feminism and youth culture: from "Jackie" to "Just Seventeen". Basingstoke: Macmillan. ISBN 0-333-45263-1. 
  8. ^ "Picture Gallery" The Times (London). Tuesday, 14 January 1964. (55908), col B, p. 5.
  9. ^ "News in Brief" The Times (London). Wednesday, 15 January 1964. (55909), col A, p. 7.
  10. ^ "De Gaulle to the Rescue", Time, 28 February 1964, retrieved 2008-08-06 .
  11. ^ Scheina, Robert L., Latin America: A Naval History 1810-1987, Annapolis, Maryland: Naval Institute Press, 1987, ISBN 978-0-87021-295-6, p. 197.
  12. ^ Shewey, Don (July 16, 1989). "'Moonlight' and Marxism". The New York Times Book Review. 
  13. ^ Fieldhouse, David Kenneth. Unilever overseas: the anatomy of a multinational 1895-1965. (Hoover Institution publications, 205). London: Croom Helm [u.a.], 1978. pp. 306-308
  14. ^ "Springtown Camp from the inside". Springtown Camp 1946-1967. 2006. Retrieved 2011-03-12. 
  15. ^ Grose, Peter (1964-02-02). "Diem's death laid to Saigon Major". The New York Times. p. 14.