Janusz Ostrogski

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Janusz Ostrogski
Prince
Janusz Konstantynowicz OStrogski.PNG
Coat of arms
Ostrogski's coat of arms
Ostrogski
Consort Zuzanna Seredi
Katarzyna Lubomirska
Teofilia Tarło

Issue

with Zuzanna Seredi
Eleonora Ostrogska
Eufrozyna Ostrogska
Noble family Ostrogski
Father Konstanty Wasyl Ostrogski
Mother Zofia Tarnowska
Born 1554
Died September 12/13, 1620

Prince Janusz Ostrogski (Lithuanian: Jonušas Ostrogiškis) (born 1554, died 1620 in Tarnów) was a Polish-Lithuanian noble and statesman. He served as a voyevoda of Volhyn (1584-1593), as a castellan of Kraków (from 1593 on), and as a starosta of Bohuslav (from 1591), Biała Cerkiew (since 1592), Czerkasy and Kaniów (from 1594), Perejasław (1604 on) and Włodzimierz.

Ostrogski was one of the richest magnates of the Commonwealth, and the last of the male line of the family. Upon his death hisestate passed to the Zasławskis.[1]

Biography[edit]

Janusz was of the princely Ostrogski family, the son of Konstanty Wasyl and Sophie née Tarnowski. He had four siblings; brothers Aleksander and Konstanty and sisters Katarzyna and Elzbieta.

He spend his early childhood in Dubno, and then lived at the court of Holy Roman Emperor in Vienna. In 1579 he converted from Orthodoxy to Roman Catholicism.

In 1577, he led the defense of Dubno against the Tatars. During the Livonian War in 1579, he participated in military campaigns in Chernigov and Novgorod-Seversky land. 2 February 1593, together with Alexander Vyshnevetsky won the battle under the heel Cossack army under the command of C. Kosinski. For the protection of state borders and their own possessions in 1609, he founded Ostrozhsky ordination, the capital of which over time became Dubna.

He has held several senior government positions. Opposed the support of the Pretender Dmitri-I and the Commonwealth War with Moscow State (1609-1618).[2]

Strengthened Dubno castle ramparts, a deep moat and a suspension bridge, and in the city founded by the Bernardine church and church of St. John of Nepomuk. In addition, fundavav churches in Mezhyrechchy, prisoners and Astrovtsy. Orthodoxy in his province does not interfere.

Cherished treasures of the ancestors, especially the prized gold medal with the image of his father, Prince Constantine-Basil, which as amulets took with him on hikes. This medal is now in the Hermitage .

Ostrogski's wives were:

Suzanne Sered (1582), children: Eleanor and Euphrosyne

Catherine Lubomirski (1597)

Teafiliya Tarlo (1612), children: Janusz Vladimir (who died in infancy)

References[edit]

  1. ^ І. Juho A. B. L. Nosevich. Ostrog / / Encyclopedia of the History of Belarus. T. 1: А — Bjelica / Belarus. Entsykl.; Editorial Board.: M. VA Beach, etc.; subject. M. Tkachev ; Mast. EE Zhakevich. — Mn.: BelEn, 1993. S. двести twenty-third
  2. ^ Valery Pozdnyakov. Ostrog / Grand Duchy of Lithuania: Encyclopedia. At 3 tons / ed. GP Pashkov et al. Volume 1: Obolensky - cadence. — - Minsk: Belarusian Encyclopedia, 2005. С. 263. S. двести sixty-third
  • Grand Duchy of Lithuania: Encyclopedia. At 3 tons / ed. GP Pashkov et al. Volume 1: Obolensky - cadence. - Minsk: Belarusian Encyclopedia, 2005. - 684 sec.: Il. ISBN 985-11-0314-4.
  • Encyclopedia of the History of Belarus. At 6 m. T. 1: А — Bjelica / Belarus. Entsykl.; Editorial Board.: M. VA Beach, etc.; subject. M. Tkachev ; Mast. EE Zhakevich. — Mn.: BelEn, 1993. — 494 [8] k.: il. ISBN 5-85700-074-2.
  • Barbara Sawczyk, Maria Sąsiadowicz, Ewa Stańczyk. Ocalić od zapomnienia... Patroni tarnowskich ulic. Tom 2. Tom second — Tarnów, 2004. ISBN 83-915445-6-7 .

See also[edit]