Japanese detective fiction

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Japanese detective fiction (Kanji: 推理小説 romaji: suiri shōsetsu?, literally: deductive reasoning fiction), is a popular genre of Japanese literature. It is generally called "Suiri shōsetsu" (推理小説?) in Japan.

History[edit]

Name[edit]

When Western detective fiction spread to Japan, it created a new genre called detective fiction (Tantei shōsetsu (探偵小説?)) in Japanese literature. After World War II, because of the Toyo Kanji limitation, the genre was renamed deductive reasoning fiction (Suiri shōsetsu (推理小説?)).[1] However, when translating the Kanji deductive reasoning (suiri (推理?)) into English, a loosely-defined term mystery is used instead of "detective fiction". Although it is not quite accurate, as "mystery fiction" does not need to follow some logic and can be supernatural or fantasy, the term "mystery fiction" is widely accepted.

Development[edit]

Edogawa Rampo is the first Japanese modern mystery writer and the founder of the Detective Story Club in Japan. Rampo was an admirer of western mystery writers. He gained his fame in early 1920s, when he began to bring to the genre many bizarre, erotic and even fantastic elements. This is partly because of the social tension before World War II.[2][3] In 1957, Seicho Matsumoto received the Mystery Writers of Japan Award for his short story The Face ( kao?). The Face and Matsumoto's subsequent works began the "social school" (社会派 shakai ha?) within the genre, which emphasized social realism, described crimes in an ordinary setting and sets motives within a wider context of social injustice and political corruption.[2][4] Since the 1980s, a "new orthodox school" (新本格派 shin honkaku ha?) has surfaced. It demands restoration of the classic rules of detective fiction and the use of more self-reflective elements. Famous authors of this movement include Soji Shimada, Yukito Ayatsuji, Rintaro Norizuki, Arisu Arisugawa (有栖川有栖), Kaoru Kitamura and Taku Ashibe.

Quotation[edit]

Seichō Matsumoto. Zuihitsu Kuroi Techyō (Essays on the Mystery Novel). 1961. pp.18 - 25.
Yukito Ayatsuji. The Murders at the Ten-cornered Residence. 1991. pp.1.

Japanese mystery awards[edit]

Top book lists of mystery fiction published in Japan[edit]

Japanese mystery writers[edit]

Pioneers of Japanese mystery writing
Writers who debuted in the late 1940s
Writers who debuted in the 1950s
Writers who debuted in the 1960s
Writers who debuted in the 1970s
Writers who debuted in the 1980s
Writers who debuted in the 1990s
Writers who debuted in the 2000s
Writers who debuted in the 2010s

Aozora Bunko[edit]

Listed below are Japanese mystery writers whose works are available in Aozora Bunko, a Japanese digital library.

Ruiko Kuroiwa's short story Muzan (1889)[1], which is also available in Aozora Bunko, is one of the earliest Japanese detective stories.

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Y

Japanese detective manga series[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ 山村正夫『推理文壇戦後史』p.87(Futabasha、1973)
  2. ^ a b Gonda, Manji (April 1993). "Crime fiction with a social consciousness". Japan Quarterly (Tokyo) 40 (2): 157–163. ISSN 0021-4590. 
  3. ^ (Gonda, 160)
  4. ^ (Gonda, 159-162)
  5. ^ Tsumao Awasaka at J'Lit Books from Japan
  6. ^ Toshihiko Yahagi at J'Lit Books from Japan
  7. ^ Atsunori Tomatsu at J'Lit Books from Japan
  8. ^ Arisu Arisugawa at J'Lit Books from Japan
  9. ^ Shogo Utano at J'Lit Books from Japan
  10. ^ Kaoru Takamura at J'Lit Books from Japan
  11. ^ Bin Konno at J'Lit Books from Japan
  12. ^ Setsuko Shinoda at J'Lit Books from Japan
  13. ^ Naomi Azuma at J'Lit Books from Japan
  14. ^ Hideo Okuda at J'Lit Books from Japan
  15. ^ Arata Tendo at J'Lit Books from Japan
  16. ^ Yuichi Shimpo at J'Lit Books from Japan
  17. ^ Tokuro Nukui at J'Lit Books from Japan
  18. ^ Fumie Kondo at J'Lit Books from Japan
  19. ^ Yutaka Maya at J'Lit Books from Japan
  20. ^ Mahokaru Numata at J'Lit Books from Japan
  21. ^ Shunichi Doba at J'Lit Books from Japan
  22. ^ Kazuaki Takano at J'Lit Books from Japan
  23. ^ Ryosuke Kakine at J'Lit Books from Japan
  24. ^ Koji Yanagi at J'Lit Books from Japan
  25. ^ Tokuya Higashigawa at J'Lit Books from Japan
  26. ^ Tetsuya Honda at J'Lit Books from Japan
  27. ^ Kanae Minato at J'Lit Books from Japan
  28. ^ Shusuke Michio at J'Lit Books from Japan
  29. ^ Honobu Yonezawa at J'Lit Books from Japan
  30. ^ Mizuki Tsujimura at J'Lit Books from Japan
  31. ^ En Mikami at J'Lit Books from Japan
  32. ^ Aki Hamanaka at J'Lit Books from Japan
  • Shimpo Hirohisa. (2000). "Parallel lives of Japan's master detectives". Japan Quarterly, 47(4), 52-57. Retrieved November 1, 2009, from ProQuest Asian Business and Reference. (Document ID: 63077831).
  • Silver, Mark; Herbert, Rosemary (1999). Crime and mystery writing in Japan. In The Oxford Companion to Crime and Mystery Writing. Oxford University Press.
  • Zoom Japon, June 1, 2010, pp 4-7 (French)

External links[edit]