Jarle Vespestad

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jarle Vespestad
Jarle Vespestad1.jpg
Background information
Born (1966-04-16) 16 April 1966 (age 48)
Kirkenes, Finnmark
Origin Norway
Genres Jazz
Occupation(s) Musician, composer
Instruments Drums, percussion
Labels ECM Records
Website www.farmers-market.net/bio/jarle-vespestad

Jarle Vespestad (born 16 April 1966 in Kirkenes, Norway) is a Norwegian jazz musician (percussion), the younger brother of jazz musician Liz Tove Vespestad, and a central member of Tord Gustavsen's projects,[1] Supersilent, Petter Wettre Trio and Quartet, Håvard Wiik Trio and Silje Nergaard's band.[2]

Career[edit]

Jarle Vespestad at Vossajazz 2014.

Vespestad graduated from the Toneheim Folk High School (1988) and Jazz program at Trondheim Musikkonservatorium (1990). In Trondheim he was involved in Veslefrekk,[3] "Trondheim Kunstorkester", Farmers Market (1991–) and the Maria Kannegaard trio (1993–). In addition he was drummer with the Embla Nordic in Copenhagen.

In Oslo Vespestad has worked with different groups since 1996, releasing albums with Sigurd Køhn (More Pepper please) and Anders Jormin (Once) in 1996.[1] He also cooperated with Silje Nergaard, Supersilent and Tord Gustavsen. He released an album and toured with Gustavsen's trio.[4]

Discography (in selection)[edit]

With Silje Nergaard
With Farmers Market
With Sigurd Køhn
  • 1998: More Pepper please (Real Records)
  • 1999: Woman's Got To Have It (Real Records)
  • 2003: Angels (Real Records)
With Tore Brunborg
  • 1998: Orbit (Curling Legs)
With Tord Gustavsen
With Roy Powell & Terje Gewelt
  • 2003: Solace (Nagel Heyer Records)
With Jacob Young & Roy Powell
  • 2011: Anthem (PVY Records)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Vespestad, Jarle Biography – Norsk Musikkinformasjon MIC.no".  (in Norwegian)
  2. ^ "Jarle Vespestad Biography – SNL.no".  Store Norske Leksikon(in Norwegian)
  3. ^ Hareuveni, Eyal (10 December 2004). "CD/LP Review: Valse Mysterioso". All About Jazz. Retrieved 18 July 2010. 
  4. ^ Kelman, John (4 April 2005). "CD/LP Review: The Ground". All About Jazz. Retrieved 18 July 2010. 

External links[edit]