Jason DeRose

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Jason DeRose is the Western Bureau Chief for National Public Radio News, based at NPR's west coast studios in Culver City, California. He edits news coverage from member station reporters and freelancers in the 13 Western states — California, Oregon, Washington, Arizona, Nevada, Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, Utah, New Mexico, Colorado, Alaska and Hawaii

Prior to this position, we was the Supervising Editor of National Public Radio's Economic Training Project. He was an editor on the NPR program Day to Day until that program was canceled in March 2009. He has reported on religion, ethics, and spirituality for National Public Radio (NPR). His reports can be heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Day to Day, and Weekend Edition. He is based at NPR's West Coast Studio in Culver City, California.

Recurrent themes in his reporting include: Islam in America; discrimination against Muslims since the September 11, 2001 attacks, sexuality as a defining issue for Christian denominations, gay and lesbian clergy, and the impact on religious communities of land use policy, zoning, and eminent domain.

Prior to his current posting at NPR West, DeRose worked at NPR's headquarters in Washington, D.C.. He spent several years as a reporter then editor at WBEZ in Chicago, Illinois. DeRose did stints at NPR member station in Seattle, Washington and Minneapolis, Minnesota; and Tampa, Florida.

DeRose serves on the Board of Directors of the Religion Newswriters Association, and as a mentor and trainer for NPR's Next Generation Radio Project — a program that teaches aspiring high school and college students public radio's unique reporting style.

DeRose has worked at the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum and the International Center for Journalists. He has also taught in the Religious Studies Department at DePaul University in Chicago and at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

DeRose graduated magna cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa from St. Olaf College in Northfield, Minnesota with majors in religion and English. He also holds a master's degree from the University of Chicago Divinity School and studied religion reporting at Northwestern University's Medill School of Journalism.

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