Jason Hervey

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jason Hervey
JasonHerveyOct08.jpg
Hervey in October 2008
Born Jason Robert Hervey
(1972-04-06) April 6, 1972 (age 42)
Los Angeles, California, U.S.
Occupation Actor/Producer/Public Relations
Years active 1978–present
Spouse(s) Kelley Patricia O'Neill (m. 1994–95) (annulled)
Children Twins, Sam & Shaina; Stepson, Tyler; Stepdaughter, Britney

Jason Robert Hervey (born April 6, 1972) is an American actor, television producer and former public relations agent. He is best known for his role as "Wayne Arnold" on The Wonder Years.

Early life and acting[edit]

Hervey was born in Los Angeles, the son of Marsha, a talent agent, and Alan Hervey, a retail sales manager.[1] In his early career, Hervey had small parts in films including Back to the Future and Pee-wee's Big Adventure and Meatballs Part II, and was a recurring character in the final season of Diff'rent Strokes. His big break came as a cast member of the successful family drama The Wonder Years, as the older brother of Fred Savage's character. He ranked at #71 on VH1's 100 Greatest Kid Stars for the role.

Hervey's role on The Wonder Years led to a later guest appearance on the animated show Justice League Unlimited. He appeared alongside Savage in the episode "Hawk and Dove", where Hervey provided the voice of the younger, more passive brother Don Hall, opposite Savage's role of the older and more aggressive brother, in a complete role reversal from The Wonder Years.

Hervey was the voice of Eddie McDowd on the Nickelodeon hit show 100 Deeds for Eddie McDowd for season 2. He made a brief appearance in the 1993 adventure game Return to Zork as the troll king.

While post-Wonder Years acting credits were few and far between for Hervey, he did maintain his ties to the entertainment industry as the producer of various sports-themed videos and specials (a substantial number of which were related to the World Championship Wrestling organization), a handful of made-for-television movies, and a few television series. As the wave of '80s nostalgia washed over the media in the early 2000s, Hervey became a noted contributor to VH1's I Love the 80s and I Love the 80s Strikes Back and appeared as himself on such popular reality shows as Hogan Knows Best and Scott Baio Is 45... and Single.

Public relations[edit]

Hervey served as the Senior Vice-President of Media and Communications for HealthSouth Corporation, based in Birmingham, Alabama. Hervey relocated to Birmingham to assume the post. He worked for the company from late 2001 until late 2003, during events that would lead to a massive fraud scandal. He later sued his employer, demanding $300,000 in compensation.[2][3]

Producing[edit]

After a guest appearance on World Championship Wrestling television during his tenure on The Wonder Years, Hervey obtained a backstage position as an executive producer for WCW, which he held until the company's closure in 2001. During this time, he became friends with then-WCW Vice President Eric Bischoff, with whom he formed Bischoff/Hervey Productions. Their company has produced several sports and reality television shows, including I Want to Be a Hilton, Scott Baio Is 45...and Single, and Hulk Hogan's Celebrity Championship Wrestling, alongside Hogan. When Bischoff joined Total Nonstop Action Wrestling (TNA) in January 2010, Hervey also joined the promotion as an executive producer.[4] He co-created the reality show TNA Reaction. Hervey appeared in a backstage segment with Eric Young on the June 16, 2011, edition of Impact Wrestling[5] which was his last appearance.

Hervey is credited in The Eddie Guerrero Story: Cheating Death, Stealing life with coming up with the idea for the Latino World Order (LWO).

Reality shows[edit]

Hervey appeared in an episode of Hogan Knows Best alongside Eric Bischoff, talking about energy drinks, and in several episodes of Scott Baio Is 45...and Single. In 2002, he made a brief appearance on the VH1 special I Love the '80s. Along with Baio, he co-hosts VH1's Confessions of a Teen Idol, a reality show in which former teen idols attempt to revitalize their entertainment careers.[6]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.filmreference.com/film/51/Jason-Hervey.html
  2. ^ Greg Farrell (May 28, 2003). "From emperor to outcast". USA Today. 
  3. ^ Associated Press (December 25, 2003). "Fired HealthSouth V.P. Jason Hervey seeks severance pay". USA Today. 
  4. ^ Caldwell, James (2010-08-12). "Caldwell's TNA Reaction TV report 8/12: TNA launches new weekly "Reaction" show with Fortune vs. EV2.0 follow-up". Pro Wrestling Torch. Retrieved 2010-08-13. "The credits rolled noting Eric Bischoff, Jason Hervey, and Dixie Carter as executive producers." 
  5. ^ Keller, Wade (2011-06-16). "Keller's TNA Impact report 6/16: Ongoing coverage of Slammiversary fallout on Spike TV". Pro Wrestling Torch. Retrieved 2011-08-19. 
  6. ^ . In 2007 Hervey pitched an idea of "Who wants to be the next Batman". Confessions of a Teen Idol's VH1 Page

External links[edit]