Jasper Place, Alberta

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For the neighbourhood within Jasper Place, see West Jasper Place, Edmonton. For the larger residential area to the west, see West Jasper Place (area), Edmonton.
Jasper Place
West Jasper Place (1910–1950)
Area (former town)
Jasper Place is located in Edmonton
Jasper Place
Jasper Place
Location of Jasper Place in Edmonton
Coordinates: 53°32′28″N 113°35′31″W / 53.541°N 113.592°W / 53.541; -113.592
Country  Canada
Province  Alberta
City Edmonton
Quadrant[1] NW
Ward[1] 1, 2 & 5
Sector[2] Mature area
Founded[3] 1910
Village[3]
Name change[3]
Town[3]
December 1949
March 1950
November 1950
Annexation[4] August 17, 1964
Government[5]
 • Administrative body Edmonton City Council
 • Councillors Linda Sloan, Kim Krushell & Karen Leibovici
Elevation 674 m (2,211 ft)

Jasper Place, originally named West Jasper Place, is a former town in Alberta, Canada now within the City of Edmonton. Prior to amalgamation with Edmonton, the town was bounded by 149 Street to the east, 118 Avenue to the north, 170 Street to the west and the North Saskatchewan River to the south. Its former municipal centre, which included its town hall, fire station and Butler Memorial Park, was located at Stony Plain Road and 157 Street. At the time of its amalgamation, Jasper Place was the largest town in Canada.[citation needed] It was known as West Jasper Place from 1910 to 1950.[3]

History[edit]

West Jasper Place was subdivided in approximately 1910.[3] In its early days, the community was home to a few hundred homesteaders, who lived a meagre life raising a few animals and tending gardens. Houses lacked the amenities of modern life, including electricity, flush toilets, and running water. Water was trucked out to residents at a cost of $1.25 per 500 gallons.[6]

During the 1930s, the population grew as many Edmontonians moved out to Jasper Place to escape high taxes in the city. Many residents worked in Edmonton, and by the 1940s the trolley line extended to the modern 149 Street, close enough to Jasper Place to allow returning workers to walk the rest of the way home.

Following the Second World War and the discovery of oil near Leduc in 1947,[7] the population of Edmonton swelled and West Jasper Place absorbed some of overflow population growth. In 1948 the community was designated a hamlet. It incorporated as the Village of West Jasper Place in December 1949, and was later renamed Jasper Place a few months later in March 1950.[3] It then incorporated as the Town of Jasper Place in November 1950.[3]

In the early 1960s, to accommodate continuing growth, Jasper Place expanded several schools, including Jasper Place Composite High School, began construction of a sports centre, and commenced planning the original Meadowlark Park Shopping Centre. Projects such as these placed the town deeply in debt and, with little industrial base, an increasing demand for services by the growing population, the province refusing to grant extra funds, and Edmonton's annexation of the land east of 149 Street, Jasper Place's independence as its own municipality was at risk. In a plebiscite held on October 17, 1962, residents voted in favor of amalgamation with Edmonton. Amalgamation occurred on August 17, 1964. "With amalgamation, the City of Edmonton assumed Jasper Place's bonded indebtedness of $8.177 million, the town's infrastructure and responsibility for all public services such as sewer, water and transportation."[8] At amalgamation, the population of Jasper Place stood at 37,429 people.[9]

Demographics[edit]

Population history,
former Town of
Jasper Place
Year Pop.   ±%  
1951 9,139 —    
1956 15,957 +74.6%
1961 30,530 +91.3%
1964 37,429 +22.6%
Sources: Statistics Canada[10][11][12]
and Alberta Municipal Affairs
[9]
Neighbourhood Population
(2012)[13]
Population
(2009)[14]
Change (%) Dwellings[13] Area (km2)[15] Density
(people/km2)
Alberta Park Industrial 0 0 0 0.66
Britannia Youngstown 4,759 4,497 5.8 2,398 1.64 2,901.8
Canora 3,335 3,335 0 1,827 0.88 3,789.8
Elmwood 2,613 2,637 −0.9 1,070 1.02 2,561.8
Garside Industrial 0 0 0 0.66
Glenwood 5,095 4,921 3.5 2,437 1.77 2,878.5
High Park 1,389 1,510 −8 646 0.72 1,929.2
High Park Industrial 0 0 0 0.39
Jasper Park 1,840 1,897 −3 973 0.66 2,787.9
Lynnwood 3,302 3,197 3.3 1,431 0.89 3,710.1
Mayfield 1,968 1,941 1.4 910 0.87 2,262.1
Meadowlark Park 2,608 2,691 −3.1 1,211 1.11 2,349.5
Norwester Industrial 0 0 0 0.69
Patricia Heights 1,751 1,793 −2.3 731 0.65 2,693.8
Rio Terrace 1,305 1,333 −2.1 509 0.58 2,250
Sheffield Industrial 0 0 0 0.38
Sherwood 1,254 1,281 −2.1 633 0.44 2,850
West Jasper Place 2,966 3,055 −2.9 1,696 0.89 3,332.6
West Meadowlark Park 3,336 3,486 −4.3 1,388 1.12 2,978.6
West Sheffield Industrial 0 0 0 0.62
Youngstown Industrial 0 0 0 0.48
Total Jasper Place 37,521 37,574 −0.1 17,860 17.12 2,194.7

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "City of Edmonton Wards & Standard Neighbourhoods". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 13, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Edmonton Developing and Planned Neighbourhoods, 2011". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 13, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Merrily K. Aubrey (2004). "Naming Edmonton: From Ada to Zoie". Edmonton: The University of Alberta Press. p. 335. Retrieved February 25, 2013. 
  4. ^ "Census History". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 24, 2013. 
  5. ^ "City Councillors". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 13, 2013. 
  6. ^ See articles "When Jasper Place Joined Edmonton" and "When Jasper Place Joined Edmonton"
  7. ^ Leduc No. 1
  8. ^ Real Estate Weekly
  9. ^ a b "1964 Population". Alberta Municipal Affairs. Retrieved February 26, 2013. 
  10. ^ "Table 6: Population by census subdivisions, 1871–1951". Ninth Census of Canada, 1951. Volume I: Population, General Characteristics. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1953. p. 6.73-6.83. 
  11. ^ "Table 6: Population by sex, for census subdivisions, 1956 and 1951". Census of Canada, 1956. Population, Counties and Subdivisions. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1957. p. 6.50-6.53. 
  12. ^ "Table 6: Population by census subdivisions, 1901–1961". 1961 Census of Canada. Series 1.1: Historical, 1901–1961. Volume I: Population. Ottawa: Dominion Bureau of Statistics. 1963. p. 6.77-6.83. 
  13. ^ a b "Municipal Census Results – Edmonton 2012 Census". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 26, 2013. 
  14. ^ "2009 Municipal Census Results". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 26, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Neighbourhoods (data plus kml file)". City of Edmonton. Retrieved February 26, 2013. 

External links[edit]