Jay O. Sanders

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Jay O. Sanders
Jay O. Sanders.jpg
Sanders in 2009
Born Jay Olcutt Sanders
(1953-04-16) April 16, 1953 (age 61)
Austin, Texas, U.S.
Occupation Actor
Years active 1979–present
Spouse(s) Maryann Plunkett (1991–present)
Children Jamie Sanders

Jay Olcutt Sanders (born April 16, 1953) is an American character actor known for his work in theatre, film, and TV. He frequently appears in work at The Public Theatre in New York City.[1]

Early life and education[edit]

Sanders was born in Austin, Texas on April 16, 1953, to Phyllis Rae (née Aden) and James Olcutt Sanders.[2] After attending the acting conservatory at SUNY Purchase, Sanders made his Off-Broadway debut in a Shakespeare in the Park production of Henry V in 1976.[3]

Career[edit]

Sanders has had a long career in film and TV, but he is probably most recognized for his work in the blockbuster films The Day After Tomorrow and Green Lantern. [4] Sanders is also noted for playing Mob lawyer character Steven Kordo in the 1986–88 NBC detective series Crime Story. Further, he is known as the narrator for the PBS series Wide Angle from 2002–2009 and has served as narrator for a number of Nova episodes starting in 2007.[5] On stage, he has appeared on Broadway in Loose Ends, The Caine Mutiny Court-Martial, Saint Joan, and Pygmalion.[6] Off-Broadway, he appeared as George W. Bush in David Hare's Stuff Happens in 2006 and the title role in Shakespeare's Titus Andronicus. He has appeared in more shows at the Delacourte theater (Shakespeare in Central Park) than any other actor to date.[7]

Filmography[edit]

Sanders as Gallileo in Two Men of Florence in 2009
Year Title Role Notes
2014 True Detective Billy Lee Tuttle 2 episodes
2013 Hostages 1 episode
20112013 Person of Interest Special Counsel 8 episodes
2011 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Captain Joseph Hannah 8 episodes
2011 Green Lantern Carl Ferris
2011 Il Gioiellino Mr. Rothman
2011 The Undying Dr. Richard Lassiter
2010 Edge of Darkness Det. Whitehouse
Zenith Doug Oberts
2008 Revolutionary Road Bart Pollock
2008 Poundcake Cliff
2007 Greetings from the Shore Commodore Callaghan
2006 Half Nelson Russ Dunne
Wedding Daze Police Officer
2004 The Day After Tomorrow Frank Harris
2003 D.C. Sniper: 23 Days of Fear Douglas Duncan (television film)
2002 Law & Order: Criminal Intent Harry Rowan
2001 Along Came a Spider FBI Agent Kyle Craig
1999 Music of the Heart Dan Paxton
Earthly Possessions Jack Emery (television film)
A.T.F. Sam Sinclair (television film)
The Jack Bull Atty. Gen. Metcalfe (television film)
Tumbleweeds Dan Miller
1998 The Odd Couple II Leroy
1997 For Richer or Poorer Samuel Yoder
The Matchmaker Senator John McGlory
Kiss the Girls FBI Agent Kyle Craig
1996 Daylight Steven Crighton
1995 The Big Green Coach Jay Huffer
Kiss of Death Federal Agent (uncredited)
1994 Angels in the Outfield Ranch Wilder
1993 My Boyfriend's Back Sheriff McCloud
1991 JFK Lou Ivon
V.I. Warshawski Murray Ryerson
1990 Mr. Destiny Jackie Earle 'Cement Head' Bumpers
1989 Booker Gordon Rudd 1 episode
1989 Glory Gen. George Crockett Strong
1989 Roseanne Norbert "Ziggy" Walsh Dan's old high school buddy
1988 Tucker: The Man and His Dream Kirby, Tucker's Attorney
1983 Cross Creek Charles Rawlings
AfterMASH Dr. Gene Pfeiffer
Living Proof: The Hank Williams, Jr. Story Dick Willey television film
1982 Hanky Panky Katz
1979 Starting Over Larry (as Jay Sanders)

References[edit]

  1. ^ Isherwood, Charles (13 December 2011). "I Wouldn’t Touch That Pie, if I Were You". The New York Times. 
  2. ^ "Jay Sanders Biography". filmreference. 2008. Retrieved 2008-07-06. 
  3. ^ Miller, J. Michael. "J. Michael Miller talks to Maryann Plunkett and Jay O. Sanders". Interview. The Actors Center. 
  4. ^ . Rotten Tomatoes http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/day_after_tomorrow/.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  5. ^ . Wide Angle Credits http://www.pbs.org/wnet/wideangle/about-the-series/credits/36/.  Missing or empty |title= (help)
  6. ^ "Jay O. Sanders at IBDB". Internet Broadway Database. 
  7. ^ Brantley, Ben (14 April 2006). "David Hare's 'Stuff Happens': All the President's Men in 'On the Road to Baghdad'". The New York Times. 

External links[edit]