Jay P. Green

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Jay P. Green, Sr. (1918 – May 20, 2008) was an ordained minister, Bible translator, publisher, and businessman.[1]

Green was born in Ennis, Kentucky. He earned degrees from Washington University in St. Louis, Toronto Baptist Seminary, and Covenant Theological Seminary.

His motivation to produce an accessible, more easily understood translation of the Bible began when he tried to read the King James Version to his children and they asked, “Daddy, why don’t you make a Bible that we can understand?” His first effort was The Children’s King James Version, New Testament (1960). He went on to produce a large number of translations of the Bible into English, some revised multiple times, including The Interlinear Hebrew-Greek-English Bible, in One-Volume. He once described himself as "the most experienced Bible translator now alive" (Paul 2003:99).

He died in Lafayette, Indiana, in 2008.

The Obituary from Hippensteel Funeral Home follows: Jay P. Green, Sr., age 89 of West Lafayette, died at Seaton Specialty Hospital in Lafayette on Tuesday, May 20, 2008. Born in Eunice, Kentucky on December 1, 1918, he was the son of the late Joseph and Anne Boggess Green. His marriage was to Mary V. Bates on April 15, 1948 in Memphis, TN and she survives. Mr. Green was a Bible translator, author and publisher. Bibles he translated were published by McGraw Hill, Harper and Rowe, Baker Book House, Hendrickson Publications Group, and Associated Publishers and Authors. He served in the Army Air Corp during WWII as a fighter pilot. He earned the rank of Captain and was discharged in 1972. Surviving with his wife is a son, Jay P. Green, Jr. of Lafayette, and two daughters, Merri Morrell of New Mexico and Rebecca Kay Greene (husband, Robin) of California.

Visitation one hour prior to the 10a.m. service on Friday, May 23, 2008 at the Chapel of All Faiths at the Indiana Veteran's Home in West Lafayette. Rev. Timothy Faber officiating. Burial to follow in the Indiana Veteran's Home Cemetery.

Twelve grandchildren and several great grandchildren also survive. Preceded in death by two sons: Kent Patrick and Michael Howard Green, two sisters: Betty Jenkins and Vernell Ieradi, and a brother: Clarence Green. Memorial contributions may be made to the American Cancer Society, Kidney Foundation, or American Heart Association. Hippensteel Funeral Home entrusted with care. Share memories and condolences online at www.hippensteelfuneralhome.com

References[edit]

  • Chamberlin, William. 1991. Catalogue of English Bible Translations: A Classified Bibliography of Versions and Editions Including Books, Parts, and Old and New Testament Apocrypha. Greenwood Press.
  • Paul, William. 2003. “Jay P. Green”. English Language Bible Translators, p. 98,99. Jefferson, NC: McFarland and Company.

Partial list of publications[edit]

  • The Children's 'King James' Bible New Testament. 1960. Modern Bible Translations, Inc.
  • The Teen-Age Version of the Holy Bible. 1962. McGraw-Hill.
  • The Children's Version of the Holy Bible. 1962. McGraw-Hill.
  • The Living Scriptures: A New Translation in the King James Tradition (New Testament). 1966. National Foundation for Christian Education: Marshallton, DE.
  • King James II Version of the Bible. 1971. Associated Publishers and Authors: Grand Rapids.
  • KJ3 Literal Translation New Testament Word for Word English Translation From The Greek Textus Receptus Text. 2006. Authors For Christ, Inc.
  • Modern King James Version of the Holy Bible. New York: McGraw-Hill.
  • The Living Scriptures: A New Translation in the King James Version Tradition. National Foundation for Religious Education.
  • King James Version—Twentieth Century Edition. Tyndale Bible Society.
  • The Gnostics, the New Versions, and the Deity of Christ, by Jay P. Green, Sr. and George Whitefield. 2000. Sovereign Grace Publishers.
  • A Concise Lexicon to the Biblical Languages. 1987. Hendrickson Publishing: Peabody, Massachusetts.
  • Unholy Hands on the Bible. 1998. Sovereign Grace Publishing.