Jayge Carr

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Marj Krueger
Born Margery Ruth Morgenstern
(1940-07-28)July 28, 1940
Houston, Texas
Died December 20, 2006(2006-12-20) (aged 66)
Austin, Texas
Pen name Jayge Carr
Occupation Author
Language English
Nationality American
Citizenship United States
Education Nuclear physics
Alma mater Wayne State University
Period 1976 - 2006
Genre Science fiction, Fantasy

Jayge Carr is the pen name of American science fiction and fantasy author Margery Ruth Morgenstern Krueger (1940–2006),[1][2] also known as Margery Krueger[3] and Marj Krueger,[2] a former nuclear physicist for NASA.[4] She is best known for her "Rabelais" series.[2]

Life[edit]

Carr was born on the 28th[3][4] of July 1940 in Houston, Texas, where she was also raised.[3] As an adult she lived in Texas and in other states. She studied physics at Carnegie Institute of Technology, Wayne State University, and Case Western Reserve University, which she left before achieving her doctorate to raise a family and write.[3]

On 20 December 2006, Carr died of cancer, leaving a husband, two daughters, two granddaughters, and three sisters.[3] Carr's remains were launched into orbit by Celestis.[5]

Writing career[edit]

Carr's first published story, "Alienation" appeared in the science fiction magazine Analog in 1976,[3] and she continued writing through the remainder of her life. She tried to inject a sense of fun into her writing.[3] Regarded by some as a feminist writer, she considered herself more as a "peoplist," dealing with such themes as bigotry and pollution in her fiction.[3]

Bibliography[edit]

Nonfiction[edit]

  • Ages of Plutonium-Beryllium Neutrons in Tungsten-Water Media (November 1966)

Rabelais series[edit]

  • Navigator's Sindrome (1983)
  • The Treasure in the Heart of the Maze (1985)
  • Rabelaisian Reprise (1988)

Other novels[edit]

  • Leviathan's Deep (1979)

Short stories[edit]

  • "Alienation" (1976)
  • "The Ax" (1977)
  • "Right of Passage" (1978)
  • "Inky" (1978)
  • "In Adam's Fall" (1979)
  • "Malthus's Day" (1979)
  • "The Pavilion Where All Times Meet" (1979)
  • "Sanctuary" (1979)
  • "Does Not a Statistic Bleed?" (1979)
  • "Star Spats" (1980)
  • "The King Is Dead! Long Live -" (1980)
  • "Child of the Wandering Sea" (1980)
  • "The Selfish Genie" (1980)
  • "The False-True Heir" (1980)
  • "Hillsong" (1980)
  • "Mustard Seed" (1981)
  • "Blind Spot" (1981)
  • "The Pacifists" (1981)
  • "Measuremen" (1982)
  • "Lungfish" (1982)
  • "The Wondrous Works of His Hands" (1982)
  • "Reunion" (1982)
  • "Hippocampocracy" (1982)
  • "The Kidnapped Key" (1983)
  • "The Spoils of Victory" (1983)
  • "Monolyth" (1983)
  • "The Tempest Within" (1983)
  • "Pieces of Eight" (1984)
  • "The Piper's Pay" (1984)
  • "Mudlark and Sky" (1984)
  • "The Heart in the Egg" (1984)
  • "Webrider" (1985)
  • "Finnegan's Wake" (1985)
  • "Immigrant" (1985)
  • "Catacombs" (1985)
  • "Webrider" (1985)
  • "Drop-Out" (1986)
  • "Rainbow's End" (1986)
  • "The Price of Lightning" (1986)
  • "Inky" (1987)
  • "Hitchhiker" (1988)
  • "Chimera" (1989)
  • "Wart" (1989)
  • "A Thief in the Night" (1989)
  • "The Icarus Epidemic" (1990)
  • "Plumduff Potato-Eye" (1990)
  • "Computer Portrait" (1990)
  • "The Kingdom of the Blind Eye" (1991)
  • "Castles in the Air" (1992)
  • "The War of '07" (1992)
  • "Mourning Blue" (1993)
  • "When Johnny Comes Marching Home Again - And Again - And Again" (1993)
  • "The Lady or the Tiger" (1993)
  • "Flea Powder" (1994)
  • "Roots and Forbidden Fruit" (1994)
  • "The Widower's Wife" (1996)
  • "Circus" (1996)
  • "Ram in Wolf's Clothing" (1997)
  • "Puss" (1999)
  • "Reflections" (2000)
  • "The Queen's Jewels" (2000)
  • "The Walls That Bind" (2001)
  • "The Lone Granger" (2002)
  • "Wimpin' Wady" (2005)

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Jayge Carr at the Internet Speculative Fiction Database
  2. ^ a b c Wands, D.C.; Dickinson, L.E. (5 November 2011). "Jayge Carr (Marj Krueger) (1940 - 2006)". Fantastic Fiction. Retrieved 20 December 2011. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h Schmidt, Stanley. "Jayge Carr Obituary". Analog Science Fiction and Fact. Retrieved 20 December 2011. 
  4. ^ a b Clute, John (21 August 2010). "Carr, Jayge". The Encyclopedia of Science Fiction. Retrieved 20 December 2011. 
  5. ^ http://www.celestis.com/memorial/newfrontier/krueger.asp

References[edit]

  • "Margery Ruth Morgenstern Krueger," obituary in the Houston Chronicle, Friday, December 22, 2006, Section B, Page 5.

External links[edit]