Jean-François Kahn

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jean-François Kahn
Jean-François Kahn.jpg
Born (1938-06-12) June 12, 1938 (age 76)
Viroflay, France
Pen name François Darras
Occupation Journalist
Nationality French
Relatives Axel Kahn

Jean-François Kahn (born 12 June 1938) is a French journalist and essayist.[1]

Life and career[edit]

Born in Viroflay, Yvelines, he is the brother of scientist Axel Kahn, and son of a Jewish father and a Catholic mother.[2] Having obtained a degree in history, he started work at a postal sorting office, then at a printing works. He soon moved into journalism and was sent to cover the war in Algeria, undertaking the journalistic investigation that became known as the ‘Ben Barka affair’. Kahn then worked as a reporter for Paris-Press, L'Express and Europe 1. He later moved to Le Monde as special correspondent for North Africa. In 1977, he became editor of the compilation of the ‘Nouvelles Littéraires’ and in 1983, was named editor of Matin de Paris. In 1984, he created L'Événement du Jeudi then in 1997, together with Maurice Szafran, started the weekly magazine, Marianne, where he was the editor in chief until 2007. He often writes under the pseudonym of François Darras or Serge Maury.

Kahn has taken a clear position on many media subjects, including :

  • Denouncing economical liberalism in 1995
  • Denouncing the intervention of NATO in Serbia in 1999
  • Denouncing the American intervention in Iraq in 2003
  • He adopted a positive position on the European Constitution in 2005 but denounced the failure of the press to provide a proper platform for those who opposed it
  • In 2007, he actively supported UDF candidate François Bayrou for the presidency
  • In 2011 he dismissed the allegations of sexual assault against Dominique Strauss-Kahn as un troussage de domestique (literally, stripping or having casual, forced sex with a servant). He later apologised and resigned from journalism.[3][4]

Partial bibliography[edit]

  • “God, How They Hated Him!”. Telos 44 (Summer 1980). New York: Telos Press.
  • La guerre civile, Seuil, 1982
  • Et si on essayait autre chose?, Seuil, 1983
  • Les Français sont formidables, Balland, 1987
  • Esquisse d'une philosophie du mensonge, Flammarion, 1992
  • Tout change parce que rien ne change, Fayard, 1994
  • On prend les mêmes et on recommence, Grasset et Fasquelle, 1997
  • Les poèmes politiques, Fayard, 1998
  • Tout était faux, Fayard, 1998
  • Demain la révolution, Flammarion, 1999
  • Chacun son tour, Stock, 2000
  • Complot contre la Démocratie, Denoël, 2000
  • La pensée unique, Fayard, 2000
  • Le retour de terre de Djid Andrew ; Critique de la raison capitaliste, Fayard, 2000
  • Victor Hugo un révolutionnaire ; L'extraordinaire Metamorphose, Fayard 2001
  • Moi, l'Autre et le loup, Fayard, 2001
  • Les Rebelles, ceux et celles qui ont dit non, Plon, 2001
  • Ce que Marianne en pense, éditions des Mille et une nuits, 2002
  • Le camp de la guerre, Critique de la déraison impure, Fayard, 2004
  • Dictionnaire incorrect, Plon, 2005
  • Comme deux frères - mémoire et visions croisées (avec Axel Kahn), Stock, 2006
  • Les bullocrates, Fayard, 2006

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Biographie de Jean-François Kahn" (in French). Retrieved 2007-10-29.  Biography published on evene.fr
  2. ^ "Comme deux frères" (in French). Retrieved 2007-10-29.  Book summary published on evene.fr
  3. ^ Doucet, David (19 May 2011). "L'affaire DSK, un "troussage de domestique"? Kahn s'excuse". L'Express. Retrieved 21 May 2011. 
  4. ^ Lichfield, John (May 23, 2011). "Feminists' anger at chauvinism of Strauss-Kahn affair". Independent (London). Retrieved May 27, 2011.