Jean-Marc Lalonde

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Jean-Marc Lalonde
Ontario MPP
In office
1999–2011
Preceded by New riding
Succeeded by Grant Crack
Constituency Glengarry-Prescott-Russell
In office
1995–1999
Preceded by Jean Poirier
Succeeded by Riding abolished
Constituency Prescott and Russell
Personal details
Born 1935 (age 78–79)
Prescott and Russell
Political party Liberal
Occupation Civil servant

Jean-Marc Lalonde (born 1935) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Liberal member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1995 to 2011.

Background[edit]

Lalonde was born in the county of Prescott and Russell in 1935.[1] He was employed in the Public Service of Canada from 1956 to 1990. He served for a time as the manager of the Canadian Government Printing Bureau, and was responsible for the establishment and operation of technical training and development for the Canada Communications Group.[1] Outside of public service, Lalonde was a co-owner of the Hull Olympiques ice hockey team in the Quebec Major Junior Hockey League for several years, and was a director of the Canadian Amateur Hockey Association from 1972 to 1976.

Politics[edit]

He was mayor of Rockland, Ontario from 1976 to 1991. For eleven years, Lalonde was a director of the Association of Municipalities of Ontario,[1] and was also the vice-president of the Association for Francophone Municipalities of Ontario for a time.

Lalonde was elected to the Ontario legislature in the 1995 provincial election, in the riding of Prescott and Russell in the easternmost section of the province.[2] The Progressive Conservatives won the election, and Lalonde joined 29 other Liberals in the official opposition. He was re-elected without difficulty in the new riding of Glengarry-Prescott-Russell in the general election of 1999.[3]

The Liberals won the 2003 election, in which Lalonde defeated his closest opponent by almost 20,000 votes.[4] Lalonde served as the Parliamentary Assistant for the Minister of Health Promotion. Prior to that, he has also worked as Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Economic Development and Trade, as Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Small Business and Entrepreneurship, Parliamentary Assistant to the Minister of Transportation and Chair of the Small Business Agency of Ontario.[5]

In the 2007 election, Lalonde was re-elected in his riding by a commanding margin over PC candidate Dennis Pommainville.[6]

On April 13, 2011, Lalonde announced that he would not run in the 2011 election.

Electoral record[edit]

Ontario general election, 2007
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Jean-Marc Lalonde 24,525 60.5 -5.47
Progressive Conservative Denis Pommainville 11,018 27.2 +2.32
Green Karolyne Pickett 2,348 5.8 +2.45
New Democratic Josée Blanchette 2,301 5.7 -0.1
Family Coalition Vicki Gunn 339 0.8 N/A
Ontario general election, 2003
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Jean-Marc Lalonde 28,956 65.97 +10.59
Progressive Conservative Albert Bourdeau 10,921 24.88 -14.26
New Democratic Guy Belle-isle 2,544 5.8 +1.28
Green Louise Pattington 1,471 3.35
Ontario general election, 1999
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Jean-Marc Lalonde 24,568 55.38
Progressive Conservative Alain Lalonde 17,364 39.14
New Democratic Stéphane Landry 2,007 4.52
Natural Law Mary Glasser 425 0.96
Ontario general election, 1995
Party Candidate Votes % ∆%
Liberal Jean-Marc Lalonde 24,808 55.7 -9.3%
Progressive Conservative Pierre Leduc 13,637 30.6 +23.5%
New Democratic Yves Deschamps 4,472 10.0 -13.5%
Libertarian Jean-Serge Brisson 626 1.4 -0.2%
Independent John MacKinnon 564 1.3
Natural Law Pierrette Blondin 446 1.0

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c O'Handley, Kathryn (2005). Canadian Parliamentary Guide 2005. ISBN 1-4144-0141-8. 
  2. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. June 8, 1995. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  3. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. June 3, 1999. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  4. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots by Candidate". Elections Ontario. October 2, 2003. Retrieved 2014-03-02. 
  5. ^ "Premier McGuinty appoints new parliamentary assistants". Ottawa: Canada NewsWire. March 6, 2006. p. 1. 
  6. ^ "Summary of Valid Ballots Cast for Each Candidate" (PDF). Elections Ontario. October 10, 2007. p. 5 (xiv). Retrieved 2014-03-02. 

External links[edit]