Jean-Pierre Mourer

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Jean-Pierre Mourer

Jean-Pierre Mourer (August 19, 1897, Wittring, Moselle - June 10, 1947, Ile Napoléon) was an Alsatian politician. He was elected to the French National Assembly in 1928, 1932 and 1936.[1]

A railway employee, Mourer joined the French Communist Party and was elected to parliament in April from the 2nd constituency of Strasbourg. In a second round of voting, he defeated Georges Weill by 7,140 votes against 6,013.[1] In parliament, he was a member of the committees on Algeria, colonies and protectorates, liberated regions, hygiene and economy.[1]

Mourer was expelled from the French Communist Party in July 1929. In October 1929, he became one of the leaders of the Opposition Communist Party of Alsace-Lorraine.[2]

In the 1932 election, he defeated the socialist Marcel-Edmond Naegelen with 6,575 votes against 6,192 in the second round.[1]

In the 1936, he was re-elected in the second round with 5,844 votes.[1]

In the fall of 1939, he was arrested along with other prominent Alsatian autonomists. In 1940, he was freed by German forces, [1] and was appointed as the Kreisleiter (Chief Administrator) of the Mulhouse district by the German authorities.[2][3] His appointment as Kreisleiter materialized in spite of reservations from the Gestapo, who were reluctant to see a former communist occupy such a strategic office. During this period, he Germanized his name to 'Hans Peter Murer'.[4]

Murer was arrested by American forces in Munich in August 1945. He was detained at Bad Mergentheim, and was later handed over to French authorities and imprisoned at Mulhouse jail.[4]

After the war, the Court of Justice of Haut-Rhin sentenced him to death on February 26, 1947, for collaboration with the Germans. He was executed by a firing squad on June 10, 1947, on Ile Napoléon.[4][5][6]

Notably, evidence in Mourer's case focused primarily not on collaboration during the occupation itself but rather on the contacts he allegedly had with Germany prior to the war.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f MOURER (Jean Pierre)
  2. ^ a b Goodfellow, Samuel. From Communism to Nazism: The Transformation of Alsatian Communists, in Journal of Contemporary History, Vol. 27, No. 2 (Apr., 1992), pp. 231-258
  3. ^ Wieviorka, Olivier. Orphans of the Republic: The Nation's Legislators in Vichy France. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2009. p. 140
  4. ^ a b c Jean-Pierre MOURER (1897 - 1947)
  5. ^ Wieviorka, Olivier. Orphans of the Republic: The Nation's Legislators in Vichy France. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2009. p. 328
  6. ^ Béné, Charles. L'Alsace Dans Les Griffes Nazies. Raon-l'Étape: Fetzer, 52, rue Jules-Ferry, 1971. p. 272
  7. ^ Raise the white flag: Conflict and collaboration in Alsace