Jean-Robert Ipoustéguy

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Jean-Robert Ipoustéguy

Jean-Robert Ipoustéguy ((1920-01-06)January 6, 1920 – February 8, 2006(2006-02-08)), a French sculptor, was born "Jean Robert" in Dun-sur-Meuse.[1]

Studied painting and drawing in Paris in 1938, under Robert Lesbounit.

After World War II, he earned his living creating frescos and stained glass windows for Saint-Jacques, Petit-Montrouge.

In the 1950s, at about the same time he turned from oil painting to sculpture and other media, the artist chose to add his mother's maiden name, "Ipoustéguy", to his name, since "Robert" is a common surname in France.[1][2]

In 1979, his largest sculpture, L'homme construit sa ville, was installed at the Congress Centre in Berlin.

In 1982 Place Pradel, in Lyon.

In 1985 Arthur Rimbaud, in Paris

In 1989 A la santé de la Révolution, in Bagnolet (France)

In 1991, Nicolas Appert in Châlons en Champagne (France).

In 1999, Porte du Ciel, Braunschweig.

In 2001 he set up in the church of Dun-sur-Meuse his sculpture Death of Bishop Neumann, produced in 1976. She had been refused by the Americans.

Ipoustéguy is buried at Cimetière de Montparnasse, Paris.[2]

Prizes, Awards and Honors[1][edit]

Porte du Ciel

Museum[edit]

Abu Dhabi, National Museum of Saadiyat Island.

Baltimore, Baltimore Museum of Art.

Berlin, Nationalgalerie.

Bobigny, Fonds Départemental d’Art Contemporain.

Châlons en Champagne, Musée des Beaux-Arts et d'Archéologie.

Chicago, Art Institute.

Copenhagen, Carlsberg Glyptotek.

Darmstadt, Hessiches Landesmuseum.

Dun sur Meuse, Centre Ipoustéguy

Grenoble, Musée d’Art Moderne.

Hannover, Sprengel Museum.

London, Tate Gallery.

London, Victoria and Albert Museum.

Lyon, Musée des Beaux-Arts.

Marseille, Musée Cantini.

Melbourne, National Gallery of Victoria.

New York, The Museum of Modern Art.

New York, Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum of Art.

Paris, Musée d’Art Moderne de la Ville de Paris.

Paris, Musée de la Sculpture en Plein Air.

Pittsburgh, The Carnegie Museum.

Tokyo, Hakone Museum of Art.

Toulouse, Artothèque.

Troyes, Musée d’Art Moderne.

Washington, Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden.

References[edit]

Catalogue raisonné 1938-2000, Dominique Croiset-Veyre, éditions de la différence, 2001 (ISBN 2-7291-1378-9)