Jeanie Buss

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Jeanie Buss
Jeanie Buss.jpg
Buss in 2009
Born (1961-09-26) September 26, 1961 (age 52)
Santa Monica, California
Alma mater University of Southern California
Occupation President of the Los Angeles Lakers
Spouse(s) Steve Timmons (m. 1990; div. 1993)

Jeanie Buss (born September 26, 1961)[1] is part-owner and president of the Los Angeles Lakers of the National Basketball Association (NBA). Buss is the daughter of Jerry Buss, a real estate investor who later owned the Lakers and other sports businesses. At age 19, she started in the family business as general manager of the Los Angeles Strings professional tennis team. She later became the owner of the Los Angeles Blades professional roller hockey team. She was also president of the Great Western Forum before becoming vice president of the Lakers. After her father died in 2013, his controlling ownership of the Lakers passed to his six children via a family trust, with each child receiving an equal vote. Buss took over as team president and represents the Lakers on the NBA Board of Governors.

Early life[edit]

Born in Santa Monica, California;[1] Buss was the third of four children to Joann and Jerry Buss. She was the third of five children, and one of two daughters; she grew up with older brothers Johnny and Jim and younger sister Janie. Their parents divorced in 1972, leaving Buss feeling emotionally abandoned.[2] At age 14, Buss attended World TeamTennis meetings with her dad, who owned the Los Angeles Strings. When she was 17, she moved in with her dad at Pickfair. She became so familiar with the estate that she led guided tours. Buss attended college at the University of Southern California (USC), where she majored in business and graduated with honors.[2][3]

Professional career[edit]

Buss' father, Jerry, named her general manager of the Los Angeles Strings when she was 19.

World TeamTennis folded in 1978, and was revived in 1981 as TeamTennis. Jerry once again owned the Strings, and he appointed the 19-year-old Buss as the general manager while she was studying at USC.[2][4] "Basically, my dad bought me the team," said Buss.[2] After the Strings folded in 1993, Buss brought professional roller hockey to Los Angeles as owner of the Los Angeles Blades in Roller Hockey International. The league named her Executive of the Year.[2][3] Buss also served four years as president of the Great Western Forum, then the home arena of the Lakers.[3] Throughout her stint with the Forum, her role with the Lakers increased, and she served as the Alternate Governor on the NBA Board of Governors since 1995.[3] In 1999, she was named executive vice president of business operations for the Lakers.[5] Her brother Jim was promoted to vice president of player personnel in 2005.[6] Their father's plan was to have Buss handle the business decisions of the team, while Jim handled the basketball side of the Lakers.[7]

Sporting News in 2005 named Buss as one of the Top 20 Most Influential Women in Sports.[8] In 2011, Forbes called Buss "one of few powerful women in sports management",[4] and ESPN said she is "one of the most powerful women in the NBA".[9]

After her father died in 2013, his 66% controlling ownership of the Lakers passed to his six children via a trust, with each child receiving an equal vote.[10][11][12] Jerry's succession plan had Buss assume his previous title as the Lakers' governor as well as its team representative at NBA Board of Governors meetings.[11][13] That summer, Buss commented that "I would be more comfortable if I understood what the decision process [on the Lakers' basketball side] was, and I’m not always involved in it."[14] In 2013–14, she became president of the Lakers; she continued to lead the team's business operations, while also overseeing its basketball operations by working with brother Jim, who continued as executive VP of basketball operations.[15][16]

Personal[edit]

Buss married volleyball player Steve Timmons in 1990 before divorcing after three years. According to Buss, "I never put my marriage first ... It was always business which attracted me."[17] She posed nude in the May 1995 issue of Playboy.[2] She is engaged to former Lakers coach and current New York Knicks President Phil Jackson, whom she began dating in December 1999.[13][18]

Publications[edit]

  • Buss, Jeanie; Springer, Steve (2010). Laker Girl. Triumph Books. ISBN 9781600785115. 

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Buss, Jeanie; Springer, Steve (2010). Laker Girl. Triumph Books. p. 24. ISBN 9781600785115. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Lidz, Franz (November 2, 1998). "She's Got Balls". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved February 19, 2013. 
  3. ^ a b c d "Los Angeles Lakers 2011–12 Media Guide". Los Angeles Lakers. p. 11. Retrieved February 19, 2013. 
  4. ^ a b Goudreau, Jenna (January 24, 2011). "LA Lakers' Jeanie Buss Doesn't Play By The Rules". Forbes. Archived from the original on February 20, 2013. 
  5. ^ Hopkins, Jim (January 5, 2003). "More daughters get keys to family firms". USA Today. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013. 
  6. ^ Ding, Kevin (May 26, 2011). "Jim Buss in 2005: 'Eventually, my dad retires'". Orange County Register. Archived from the original on February 20, 2013. 
  7. ^ Siler, Ross (August 24, 2005). "Meet The New Buss Jerry's Son, Jim, Is Carving His Own Niche As Heir To Lakers Empire". Daily News (Los Angeles). Retrieved February 20, 2013. (subscription required)
  8. ^ Ireland, John (May 3, 2009). "All in the Family". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013. 
  9. ^ Shelburne, Ramona (November 2, 2010). "Jeanie Buss talks about life with Lakers". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013. 
  10. ^ Bresnahan, Mike (April 19, 2014). "Buss family faces crucial moment with the Lakers". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on April 20, 2014. 
  11. ^ a b Markazi, Arash (February 18, 2013). "Buss family won't sell Lakers". ESPN.com. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013. 
  12. ^ Medina, Mark (February 18, 2013). "Jerry Buss' family will honor his wishes and keep Lakers". Daily News (Los Angeles). Archived from the original on February 22, 2013. 
  13. ^ a b Bresnahan, Mike (February 19, 2013). "Lakers expected to remain a Buss family-owned team". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013. 
  14. ^ Deveney, Sean (August 15, 2013). "Jim Buss and the Lakers, still paying for Chris Paul". SportingNews.com. Archived from the original on October 21, 2013. 
  15. ^ "Lakers 2013–14 Media Guide". Los Angeles Lakers. 2013. p. 7. Archived from the original on December 12, 2013. 
  16. ^ Bresnahan, Mike (March 19, 2014). "Jeanie Buss explains Kobe Bryant's contract, Phil Jackson situation". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on March 22, 2014. 
  17. ^ Springer, Steve (November 24, 2002). "Buss—The Next Generation". Los Angeles Times. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013. 
  18. ^ Wise, Mike (May 27, 2001). "He Just Wins, and Wins". The New York Times. Archived from the original on February 19, 2013.