Jedediah Berry

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Jedediah Berry (born 1977) is an American writer. He is the author of a novel, The Manual of Detection (2009).

Background and education[edit]

Berry was born in Randolph, Vermont, and spent his childhood in Catskill, New York. He attended Bard College, and earned a graduate degree from the MFA Program for Poets & Writers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. He has worked as an editor at Small Beer Press.[1]

Work[edit]

Berry’s first novel, The Manual of Detection, was published by The Penguin Press in 2009. It won the 2009 Hammett Prize[2] and the 2010 Crawford Award.[3] Set in an unnamed city, the novel follows file clerk Charles Unwin as he attempts to solve a mystery involving a missing detective and a criminal mastermind operating through people’s dreams. Critics have noted that The Manual of Detection combines elements from several genres of fiction, including mystery and fantasy.[4] Writing for The Guardian, Michael Moorcock situated the book within the tradition of steampunk fiction.[5] The New Yorker called it “the kind of mannered fantasy that might result if Wes Anderson were to adapt Kafka.”[6] A reviewer for The Observer compared it to The Third Policeman by Flann O'Brien, and described it as “imaginative, fantastical, sometimes inexplicable, labyrinthine and ingenious.”[7]

Berry’s short stories have appeared in Conjunctions, Chicago Review, Ninth Letter, and other magazines. He has taught at the MFA Program for Poets & Writers at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and he currently teaches at Bard College.[8]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ "Jedediah Berry: A Stranger Road", Locus, 2010-07-01 
  2. ^ "IACW/NA: Hammett Prize: Past Years". 
  3. ^ "Jedediah Berry Wins Crawford Award". 
  4. ^ Lo Dico, Joy (2010-06-20), "The Manual of Detection, By Jedediah Berry", The Independent on Sunday 
  5. ^ Moorcock, Michael (2009-08-22), "The Manual of Detection by Jedediah Berry", The Guardian 
  6. ^ "Books Briefly Noted", The New Yorker, 2009-03-09 
  7. ^ Guttridge, Peter (2009-04-05), "The Manual of Detection", The Observer 
  8. ^ "Bard College". 

External links[edit]