Jeff Doyle (author)

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Jeff Doyle (born September 5, 1955) is an American author. He writes financial suspense novels that are set in Northern California. San Francisco is a favorite back drop as are the Napa Valley, the California river delta, and the mountain hamlet of Truckee in the Sierra Nevada near Lake Tahoe.

Doyle graduated with a Bachelor of Architecture from the University of Oregon in 1978. While at the university, Doyle worked in the housing department, pioneered the "Escape" program that placed students in local high school classrooms, and served on a variety of campus committees. His community service evolved into the establishment of a non profit enrichment program for elementary school children, known as "MEL" (Mobile Educational Laboratory), that was inaugurated in 1994.

Professionally, Doyle served the U.S. Department of Reclamation as a private contractor and worked for several years on noteworthy projects including the Aubrun Dam and the Central Valley Water Project. His design and construction know-how was tapped by Intel Corporation when they moved into the Sacramento region in 1984. By 1986, Jeff Doyle created his own design and build construction business. The firm was recognized as one of twenty five stand-out start-up businesses in the Sacramento region in 1991 by the national accounting firm Arthur Andersen. In 1993, Doyle was again praised, this time for his commitment to process control. He joined an out-reach program that worked throughout the region to build awareness for the importance of quality improvement.

Doyle began his first novel in 1994. Silver Lining: Special Assets 3 was released in 2004.[1] The prequel, Irresistible Leverage - Special Assets 2, was released in 2006. His decades experience with finance and construction matters serve as the basis for his stories. Characters and unique situations are derived from the seven years during which he managed construction and civil litigation cases, from 1995 though 2002. Likewise, a brief stint with an Internet start-up in 1998 that succumbed to the dot-com bust of 2000, adds technological intrigue to his tales.

Short stories[edit]

  • "The Cabin", 2004
  • "Harvest", 2005
  • "Quick Ratio", 2005

References[edit]

  1. ^ "It's a mystery". The Sacramento Bee. 19 July 2004. p. E3. Retrieved 22 December 2010. 

External links[edit]