Jeff Monroe

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Jeff Monroe
Member of the South Dakota Senate
from the 24th[1] district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 8, 2013
Preceded by Bob Gray
Member of the South Dakota House of Representatives
from the 24th district
In office
January 1995 – January 2003
Serving with Lola Schreiber (1995–1997)
Patricia de Hueck (1997–1999)
Cooper Garnos (1999–2003)
Preceded by Mike Shaw
Personal details
Born (1956-09-05) September 5, 1956 (age 58)
Grafton, North Dakota
Nationality American
Political party Republican
Residence Pierre, South Dakota
Alma mater University of Nebraska–Lincoln
Northwestern College of Chiropractic
New York Chiropractic College
Profession Chiropractic Doctor

Jeffrey 'Jeff' Rodrick Monroe[2] (born September 5, 1956 in Grafton, North Dakota) is an American politician and a Republican member of the South Dakota Senate representing District 24 since January 8, 2013. Monroe served non-consecutively in the South Dakota Legislature from January 1995 until January 2003 in the South Dakota House of Representatives District 24 seat.

Education[edit]

Monroe graduated from the University of Nebraska–Lincoln and Northwestern College of Chiropractic (now Northwestern Health Sciences University) with post graduate work at New York Chiropractic College.

Elections[edit]

  • 2012 When incumbent Senate District 22 Republican Senator Bob Gray was term limited and left the District 24 seat open, Monroe was unopposed for the June 5, 2012 Republican Primary[3] and won the November 6, 2012 General election by 35 votes with 1,999 votes (50.4%) against Democratic Representative Tad Perry; an election recount did not change the result.[4]
  • 1994 When House District 24 incumbent Republican Representative Mike Shaw left the Legislature and left the seat open, Monroe ran in the four-way June 7, 1994 Republican Primary and placed second with 2,082 votes (25.11%),[5] in the four-way November 8, 1994 General election, incumbent Republican Representative Lola Schreiber took the first seat by 8 votes and Monroe took the second seat with 6,913 votes (32.7%) ahead of Democratic nominees Kerry Bowers and Bob Hiatt.[6]
  • 1996 When House District 24 incumbent Republican Representative Schreiber left the Legislature and left a seat open, Monroe ran in the five-way 1996 Republican Primary and placed second with 2,082 votes (25.11%),[7] in the four-way November 5, 1996 General election, Patricia de Hueck took the first seat and Monroe took the second seat with 5,218 votes (25.28%) ahead of Democratic nominees Ken Larsen and James Hoffman.[8]
  • 1998 When House District 24 incumbent Republican Representative de Hueck left the Legislature and left a seat open, Monroe ran in the four-way 1998 Republican Primary and placed first with 2,490 votes (30.99%),[9] in the four-way November 3, 1998 General election, fellow Republican nominee Cooper Garnos took the first seat and Monroe took the second seat with votes (29.7%) ahead of returning 1996 Democratic opponent James Hoffman and Democratic nominee Duwayne Slaathaug.[10]
  • 2000 Monroe and Representative Garnos were unopposed for the June 6, 2000 Republican Primary[11] and won the three-way November 7, 2000 General election where Representative Garnos took the first seat and Monroe took the second seat with 7,123 votes (39.5%) ahead of Democratic nominee Robert Hockett.[12]
  • 2002 Term limited from remaining in the House, Monroe challenged incumbent Republican Senator de Hueck for the District 24 seat, but lost the June 4, 2002 Republican Primary by 94 votes to Senator de Hueck;[13] de Hueck was unopposed for the November 5, 2002 General election;[14] she lost the primary election in 2004, and served in the seat from 2001 until 2005.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Senator Jeff Monroe". Pierre, South Dakota: South Dakota Legislature. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  2. ^ "Jeffrey Rodrick Monroe's Biography". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  3. ^ "Official Results Primary Election - June 5, 2012". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  4. ^ "Official Results General Election November 6, 2012". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  5. ^ "South Dakota Legislative Primary Election June 7, 1994". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. p. 1. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  6. ^ "1994 General Election Returns for Legislature". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  7. ^ "1996 Primary election Returns". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. p. 1. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  8. ^ "1996 South Dakota General Election Legislative Races". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  9. ^ "1998 Legislative Primary Returns". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  10. ^ "1998 General Election Official Canvass Legislative Candidates". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  11. ^ "2000 Republican Legislative Primaries". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  12. ^ "2000 General Election Official Returns for Legislature". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  13. ^ "2002 Republican Legislative Primary Official Returns". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 
  14. ^ "2002 Legislature Official Returns". Pierre, South Dakota: Secretary of State of South Dakota. Retrieved January 23, 2014. 

External links[edit]