Jefferson Township, New Jersey

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Jefferson Township, New Jersey
Township
Township of Jefferson
Jefferson Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Jefferson Township highlighted in Morris County. Inset map: Morris County highlighted in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Jefferson Township, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Jefferson Township, New Jersey
Coordinates: 41°00′10″N 74°33′34″W / 41.002672°N 74.559507°W / 41.002672; -74.559507Coordinates: 41°00′10″N 74°33′34″W / 41.002672°N 74.559507°W / 41.002672; -74.559507[1][2]
Country  United States
State  New Jersey
County Morris
Incorporated February 11, 1804
Government[6]
 • Type Faulkner Act (Mayor-Council)
 • Mayor Russell W. Felter (term ends December 31, 2018)[3]
 • Administrator James M. Leach[4]
 • Clerk Lori Harvin[5]
Area[1]
 • Total 43.108 sq mi (111.651 km2)
 • Land 39.132 sq mi (101.353 km2)
 • Water 3.976 sq mi (10.298 km2)  9.22%
Area rank 47th of 566 in state
3rd of 39 in county[1]
Elevation[7] 1,142 ft (348 m)
Population (2010 Census)[8][9][10]
 • Total 21,314
 • Estimate (2013)[11] 21,522
 • Rank 122nd of 566 in state
8th of 39 in county[12]
 • Density 544.7/sq mi (210.3/km2)
 • Density rank 439th of 566 in state
34th of 39 in county[12]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 07435 - Newfoundland[13]
07438 - Oak Ridge[14]
07849 - Lake Hopatcong[15]
07885 - Wharton[16]
Area code(s) 973[17]
FIPS code 3402734980[1][18][19]
GNIS feature ID 0882210[1][20]
Website www.jeffersontownship.net

Jefferson Township is the northernmost township in Morris County, New Jersey, United States.[21] As of the 2010 United States Census, the township's population was 21,314,[8][9][10] having increased by 1,597 (+8.1%) from the 19,717 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn increased by 1,892 (+10.6%) from the 17,825 counted in the 1990 Census.[22]

Jefferson Township was formed as a township by an Act of the New Jersey Legislature on February 11, 1804, from portions of Pequannock Township and Roxbury Township.[23] The township was named after Thomas Jefferson, the President of the United States at the time the Township was created.[24]

Geography[edit]

According to the United States Census Bureau, the township had a total area of 43.108 square miles (111.651 km2), of which, 39.132 square miles (101.353 km2) of it was land and 3.976 square miles (10.298 km2) of it (9.22%) was water.[1][2]

The township borders Mount Arlington, Rockaway Township, Roxbury Township and Wharton in Morris County; West Milford Township in Passaic County; and Hardyston Township, Hopatcong and Sparta Township in Sussex County.

The township has two large divisions, Milton and Lake Hopatcong.[25] Each half has its own first-aid squad, fire department substation, and set of elementary schools. Addresses in the Milton section of the township are classified under the Oak Ridge mailing city, which is shared with a portion of West Milford Township, or in the Newfoundland mailing area, shared with a portion of West Milford and Rockaway Township. Addresses in Lake Hopatcong use either Lake Hopatcong (not to be confused with the Hopatcong mailing city used in the Borough of Hopatcong) or Wharton as their mailing city. The Jefferson Township Municipal Building, Middle School, High School, Recycling Center, and school bus depot are positioned at the boundary between the two halves of the township.[citation needed]

Lake Swannanoa is an unincorporated community located within Jefferson Township.[26]

Other unincorporated communities, localities and place names located partially or completely within the township include Berkshire Valley, Bowling Green Mountain, Cozy Lake, Espanong, Ford, Halsey Island, Hopatcong Station, Hopewell, Hurdtown, Lake Hopatcong, Longwood Mountains, Lower Longwood, Minisink, Mooseback Pond, New Russia, Newfoundland, Nolans Point, Oak Ridge, Petersburg, Prospect Point, Raccoon Island, Russia, Tierneys Corner, Upper Longwood, Weldon, Woodport and Woodstock.[27]

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1810 1,281
1820 1,231 −3.9%
1830 1,551 26.0%
1840 1,412 −9.0%
1850 1,358 −3.8%
1860 1,471 8.3%
1870 1,430 −2.8%
1880 1,792 25.3%
1890 1,611 −10.1%
1900 1,341 −16.8%
1910 1,303 −2.8%
1920 1,226 −5.9%
1930 1,254 2.3%
1940 1,548 23.4%
1950 2,744 77.3%
1960 6,884 150.9%
1970 14,122 105.1%
1980 16,413 16.2%
1990 17,825 8.6%
2000 19,717 10.6%
2010 21,314 8.1%
Est. 2013 21,522 [11][28] 1.0%
Population sources:
1810-1920[29] 1840[30]
1850-1870[31] 1850[32]
1870[33] 1880-1890[34]
1890-1910[35] 1910-1930[36]
1900-1990[37] 2000[38][39] 2010[8][9][10]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 21,314 people, 7,830 households, and 5,794 families residing in the township. The population density was 544.7 per square mile (210.3/km2). There were 8,597 housing units at an average density of 219.7 per square mile (84.8/km2). The racial makeup of the township was 90.64% (19,318) White, 1.56% (332) Black or African American, 0.08% (18) Native American, 4.60% (981) Asian, 0.02% (4) Pacific Islander, 1.49% (317) from other races, and 1.61% (344) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 6.48% (1,382) of the population.[8]

There were 7,830 households, of which 35.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 8.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 26.0% were non-families. 20.7% of all households were made up of individuals, and 7.1% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.72 and the average family size was 3.19.[8]

In the township, 24.6% of the population were under the age of 18, 7.1% from 18 to 24, 25.8% from 25 to 44, 31.7% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40.9 years. For every 100 females there were 100.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.3 males.[8] The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $92,095 (with a margin of error of +/- $6,923) and the median family income was $102,324 (+/- $6,788). Males had a median income of $73,152 (+/- $3,827) versus $51,933 (+/- $2,776) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $37,912 (+/- $1,795). About 2.6% of families and 3.5% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.2% of those under age 18 and 4.2% of those age 65 or over.[40]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[18] there were 19,717 people, 7,131 households, and 5,448 families residing in the township. The population density was 485.3 people per square mile (187.4/km²). There were 7,527 housing units at an average density of 185.2 per square mile (71.5/km²). The racial makeup of the township was 96.14% White, 0.83% African American, 0.16% Native American, 1.07% Asian, 0.05% Pacific Islander, 0.62% from other races, and 1.14% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.41% of the population.[38][39]

As of the 2000 Census, 25.7% of residents identified their ancestry as Italian, 22.9% Irish, 21.7% German, 11.6% English and 10.0% Polish.[38]

There were 7,131 households out of which 38.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 65.5% were married couples living together, 7.7% had a female householder with no husband present, and 23.6% were non-families. 18.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 6.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.76 and the average family size was 3.17.[38][39]

In the township the age distribution of the population shows 26.9% under the age of 18, 5.5% from 18 to 24, 33.8% from 25 to 44, 25.2% from 45 to 64, and 8.6% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 98.3 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 96.8 males.[38][39]

The median income for a household in the township was $68,837, and the median income for a family was $76,974. Males had a median income of $51,359 versus $37,849 for females. The per capita income for the township was $27,950. About 1.0% of families and 2.4% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.2% of those under age 18 and 4.3% of those age 65 or over.[38][39]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Jefferson Township is governed under a Mayor-Council system of municipal government under the Faulkner Act. The government consists of a Mayor and a five-member Township Council whose members are elected at-large in partisan elections to serve four-year terms on a staggered basis, with either three council seats or two council seats and the mayor coming up for election every other year as part of the November general election.[6]

As of 2015, the Mayor of Jefferson Township is Republican Russell Felter, whose term of office ends December 31, 2018.[4] Members of the Jefferson Township Council are Council President Richard Yocum (R, 2016).[41] Council Vice-President Robert Birmingham (R, 2016),[42] Jay Dunham (R, 2016),[43] Debi Merz (R, 2018)[44] and Michael J. Sanchelli (R, 2018).[45][46][47][48][49]

In the 2010 race for mayor, Russell Felter defeated Democrat Horace Chamberlain. Township Council incumbents Debi Merz and Michael Sanchelli ran unopposed. In the race to fill the remaining portion of the term vacated by Brooke Hardy, incumbent Jay Dunham defeated independent Kim Finnegan.[50]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Jefferson Township is located in the 11th Congressional District[51] and is part of New Jersey's 26th state legislative district.[9][52][53] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Jefferson Township had been in the 25th state legislative district.[54]

New Jersey's Eleventh Congressional District is represented by Rodney Frelinghuysen (R, Harding Township).[55] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark, term ends 2021)[56] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus, 2019).[57][58]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 26th Legislative District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by Joseph Pennacchio (R, Montville) and in the General Assembly by BettyLou DeCroce (R, Parsippany-Troy Hills) and Jay Webber (R, Morris Plains) and [59][60] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[61] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[62]

Morris County is governed by a seven-member Board of Chosen Freeholders, who are elected at-large to three-year terms on a staggered basis, with either two or three seats up for election each year as part of the November general election. The Freeholder Board sets policies for the operation of six super-departments, more than 30 divisions plus authorities, commissions, boards and study committees.[63] Actual day-to-day operation of departments is supervised by County Administrator, John Bonanni.[64] As of 2014, Morris County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Thomas Mastrangelo (Montville, term ends December 31, 2016),[65] Deputy Freeholder Director David Scapicchio (Mount Olive Township, 2015),[66] Douglas Cabana (Boonton Township, 2016),[67] John Cesaro (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2015),[68] Kathryn A. DeFillippo (Roxbury Township, 2016),[69] John Krickus (Washington Township, 2015)[70] and William "Hank" Lyon (Montville, 2014).[71][64][72] Constitutional officers are County Clerk Ann F. Grossi (Parsippany-Troy Hills Township, 2018),[73] Sheriff Edward V. Rochford (Morris Plains, 2016)[74] and Surrogate John Pecoraro (Mendham Borough, 2014).[64][75]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 13,142 registered voters in Jefferson Township, of which 2,395 (18.2%) were registered as Democrats, 4,347 (33.1%) were registered as Republicans and 6,392 (48.6%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 8 voters registered to other parties.[76]

In the 2012 presidential election, Republican Mitt Romney received 58.2% of the vote (5,370 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 40.7% (3,757 votes), and other candidates with 1.0% (94 votes), among the 9,279 ballots cast by the township's 13,742 registered voters (58 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 67.5%.[77][78] In the 2008 presidential election, Republican John McCain received 57.2% of the vote (6,040 cast), ahead of Democrat Barack Obama with 41.0% (4,335 votes) and other candidates with 1.1% (121 votes), among the 10,564 ballots cast by the township's 13,631 registered voters, for a turnout of 77.5%.[79] In the 2004 presidential election, Republican George W. Bush received 61.9% of the vote (5,946 ballots cast), outpolling Democrat John Kerry with 36.9% (3,542 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (97 votes), among the 9,605 ballots cast by the township's 12,847 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 74.8.[80]

In the 2013 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 70.6% of the vote (4,043 cast), ahead of Democrat Barbara Buono with 27.9% (1,596 votes), and other candidates with 1.6% (89 votes), among the 5,789 ballots cast by the township's 13,715 registered voters (61 ballots were spoiled), for a turnout of 42.2%.[81][82] In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Republican Chris Christie received 63.4% of the vote (4,270 ballots cast), ahead of Democrat Jon Corzine with 26.8% (1,809 votes), Independent Chris Daggett with 8.5% (572 votes) and other candidates with 0.8% (56 votes), among the 6,738 ballots cast by the township's 13,397 registered voters, yielding a 50.3% turnout.[83]

Education[edit]

The Jefferson Township Public Schools serve students in Kindergarten through twelfth grade. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's seven schools had an enrollment of 3,448 students and 269.4 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 12.80:1.[84] Schools in the district (with 2011-12 enrollment data from the National Center for Education Statistics[85]) are Milton School[86] (PreK, 158 students), Ellen T. Briggs School[87] (K-2; 370), Cozy Lake School[88] (1&2; 254), Arthur T. Stanlick School[89] (3-5; 379), White Rock Elementary School[90] (3-5; 409), Jefferson Township Middle School[91] (6-8; 827) and Jefferson Township High School[92] (9-12; 1,051).[93]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of May 2010, the township had a total of 133.62 miles (215.04 km) of roadways, of which 112.52 miles (181.08 km) were maintained by the municipality, 12.77 miles (20.55 km) by Morris County and 8.33 miles (13.41 km) by the New Jersey Department of Transportation.[94]

A few major roads pass through Jefferson. Green Pond Road, officially CR 513, is the only major county road that passes through for a short stretch in the northeast section. State routes include Route 15 (part of the "Sparta Bypass") in the southwest, Route 23 in the northeast (as it crises-crosses along the Passaic county line) and Route 181 in the southwest.

Interstate 80 also passes through very briefly in the southern tip without any interchanges; the closest exits are 33 and 34 in neighboring Wharton.

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit provides local bus service on the 967 and MCM7 routes.[95]

Jefferson Township Day[edit]

Newfoundland Train Station

Every year, the weekend following Independence Day, The Jefferson Arts Committee hosts a day of celebration known as Jefferson Township Day (it is colloquially referred to as "Jefferson Day"). Throughout the entire day, entertainment and festivities at the Jefferson Township High School are provided. Up until 2012 there would be a morning parade featuring the town's fire trucks, high school marching band and other local groups march down Weldon Road. Starting in 2013 the parade has been substituted with various activities such as a fishing contest, kids kart race and a road bowling tournament. There are a variety of activities set up on the Jefferson Township High School grounds for participants of Jefferson Day, including children's games, food and craft vendors, and performances at two stages. At night, the Jefferson Township Community Band, directed by Peter Tummillo Jr., performs before the display of fireworks.[96]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Jefferson Township include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f County Subdivisions: New Jersey - 2010 Census Gazetteer Files, United States Census Bureau. Accessed July 9, 2013.
  2. ^ a b US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  3. ^ 2014 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs, as of December 15, 2014. Accessed January 20, 2015. As of date accessed, Felter is listed as mayor with a term-end year of 2016.
  4. ^ a b Mayor & Administration Page, Jefferson Township. Accessed January 20, 2015. As of date accessed, Felter is listed with a term-end year of 2014.
  5. ^ Township Clerk, Jefferson Township. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  6. ^ a b 2005 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, April 2005, p. 116.
  7. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Township of Jefferson, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 6, 2013.
  8. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Jefferson township, Morris County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  9. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 12. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  10. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Jefferson township, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed August 7, 2012.
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  12. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed December 18, 2012.
  13. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Newfoundland, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  14. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Oak Ridge, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  15. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Lake Hopatcong, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  16. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Wharton, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  17. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Jefferson, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  18. ^ a b American FactFinder, United States Census Bureau. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  19. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  20. ^ US Board on Geographic Names, United States Geological Survey. Accessed September 4, 2014.
  21. ^ Home page, Jefferson Township. Accessed September 8, 2011. "Beautiful Jefferson Township is nestled deep in the northwest corner of Morris County, New Jersey. This countryside town is just minutes off of RT. 80 and located less than an hour from New York City."
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  24. ^ Staff. "Patch Call", FBI Law Enforcement Bulletin, March 2011. Accessed September 8, 2011. "The patch of the Jefferson Township, New Jersey, Police Department centers on the naming of the department's jurisdiction. The township was incorporated in 1804, the same year as Thomas Jefferson's recorded inauguration as the third president of the United States. As such, the patch displays a profile bust of Thomas Jefferson, intersecting U.S. and New Jersey flags, and the year 1804."
  25. ^ Willis, R. Richard; and Lees, Lorraine C. Jefferson Township on Lake Hopatcong, p. 7. Arcadia Publishing, 2001. ISBN 0-7385-0077-1. Accessed November 20, 2011. "Jefferson Township is a large municipality that is separated into two major sections, Lake Hopatcong and Oak Ridge/Milton, with the Mahlon Dickerson County Park in the middle."
  26. ^ Cella, Chris. "Jefferson Township officials need further discussion on Lake Swannanoa", Aim Jefferson, April 14, 2011. Accessed September 8, 2011. "At last week's Jefferson Town Council meeting there was a large turnout as many townspeople anxiously awaited the discussions regarding the Lake Swannanoa dam restoration. During the March 16 meeting over 40 people spoke out during the public portion of the meeting, voicing their opinions and thoughts as to whether or not the town should agree to pay for repairs on the Swannanoa dam, as proposed by the Lake Swannanoa Homeowners Association."
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  41. ^ Richard Yocum, Jefferson Township. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  42. ^ Robert Birmingham, Jefferson Township. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  43. ^ Jay Dunham, Jefferson Township. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  44. ^ Debi Merz, Jefferson Township. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  45. ^ Michael Sanchelli, Jefferson Township. Accessed January 20, 2015.
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  68. ^ John Cesaro, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  69. ^ Kathryn A. DeFillippo, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  70. ^ John Krickus, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
  71. ^ William "Hank" Lyon, Morris County, New Jersey. Accessed September 6, 2014.
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  84. ^ District information for Jefferson Township School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  85. ^ School Data for the Jefferson Township Public Schools, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  86. ^ Milton School, Jefferson Township Public Schools. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  87. ^ Ellen T. Briggs School, Jefferson Township Public Schools. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  88. ^ Cozy Lake School, Jefferson Township Public Schools. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  89. ^ Arthur T. Stanlick School, Jefferson Township Public Schools. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  90. ^ White Rock Elementary School, Jefferson Township Public Schools. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  91. ^ Jefferson Township Middle School, Jefferson Township Public Schools. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  92. ^ Jefferson Township High School, Jefferson Township Public Schools. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  93. ^ New Jersey School Directory for the Jefferson Township Public Schools, New Jersey Department of Education. Accessed January 20, 2015.
  94. ^ Morris County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  95. ^ Morris County Bus / Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed August 7, 2012.
  96. ^ Home page, Jefferson Arts Committee. Accessed November 23, 2008.
  97. ^ Jennings, Rob. "Jefferson native, SpongeBob go way back: Cartoonist an executive producer for animated film", Daily Record (Morristown), November 19, 2004. Accessed October 23, 2007. "But in Jefferson, Drymon is perhaps best remembered as an offensive guard and defensive tackle on the high school's state championship football team in 1986.... At Jefferson High School, when not playing football, Drymon was sketching comic books."
  98. ^ Myers, Ali. "Bloom Idol II now down to top ten", Bloomsburg University Voice, November 12, 2004. Accessed January 20, 2012. "Eric Harm - Hometown: Jefferson, N.J."
  99. ^ Mike Leach profile, CNN Sports Illustrated. Accessed December 10, 2008.
  100. ^ Luciano, John R. "Jefferson resident honored by Boston Music Hall of Fame", Aim Jefferson, January 21, 2011. Accessed April 11, 2011. "Vern Miller poses in his in-home studio with his artist/teacher wife Sue. The couple lives in a memorabilia-packed home on Lake Shawnee in Jefferson Township."
  101. ^ Hague, Jim. "Falcons end grid season on high note with win over Lodi", Aim Jefferson, November 19, 2010. Accessed March 29, 2012. "Freshman quarterback J.R. Reese finished with a flair. Reese completed all six of his passes Friday night for 75 yards and two touchdowns. The son of Giants general manager Jerry Reese has a very bright future with the Falcons and still has three years to fine tune his signal calling skills."

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