Jeffrey Rosen

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Jeffrey Rosen in February 2008

Jeffrey Rosen (born February 13, 1964)[1] is an American academic and commentator on legal affairs. Legal historian David Garrow has called him "the nation's most widely read and influential legal commentator".[2] Since 2013, he has served as the President and CEO of the National Constitution Center in Philadelphia.

Biography[edit]

Rosen is the son of Sidney and Estelle Rosen, both of whom are psychiatrists.[3] He has been married to Christine Rosen (formerly Stolba), a historian, since 2003. He graduated summa cum laude from Harvard University and was a Marshall scholar at Oxford University, from which he received a second bachelor's degree. He also has a law degree from Yale Law School.[3]

He is a professor of law at George Washington University Law School in Washington, D.C., and has been the commentator on legal affairs for The New Republic since 1992. Rosen is a nonresident senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, where he speaks and writes about technology and the future of democracy.[4] He often appears as a guest on National Public Radio, and is a frequent contributor to the New York Times Magazine.[5]

Journalism[edit]

Rosen has written frequently about the United States Supreme Court. He has interviewed Chief Justice John Roberts,[6] Justice John Paul Stevens,[7] and Justice Stephen Breyer.[8] Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg credited his early support for her Supreme Court candidacy as a factor in her nomination.[9] More recently, an essay posted on The New Republic website about Sonia Sotomayor, the then-potential nominee for the Supreme Court,[10] provoked controversy for using anonymous sources.[11][12] However, other media outlets, including the New York Times, had relied upon similar sources.[13][14] Rosen has known Justice Elena Kagan for many years and is the brother-in-law of Neal Katyal, the acting Solicitor General.[15] In an opinion piece published after Kagan's nomination hearings and before the Senate's vote on her confirmation, Rosen encouraged Kagan to look to the late Justice Louis Brandeis as a model "to develop a positive vision of progressive jurisprudence in an age of economic crisis, financial power and technological change".[15]

Rosen's articles assessing the Supreme Court have been ideologically unpredictable. He strongly denounced Bush v. Gore,[16] but supported the nomination of Chief Justice Roberts, while opposing that of Justice Alito.[17] He supported Sotomayor's confirmation,[18] and has written stories for the New York Times Magazine about the Court's pro-business,[19] anti-regulatory agenda.[20]

Rosen also writes frequently about the effects of technology on privacy and liberty, including articles about the Fourth Amendment implications of pre-flight screening by the TSA,[21] free speech on the Internet,[22] privacy in the Internet Age,[23] surveillance cameras in Britain,[24] data mining in Silicon Valley,[25] technology and the Constitution,[26] the effect of neuroscience on the law,[27] DNA databases and genetic surveillance,[28] and Google and the future of free speech.[29]

Bibliography[edit]

  • The Supreme Court: The Personalities and Rivalries that Defined America, New York: Times Books, 2007. ISBN 0-8050-8182-8.
  • The Most Democratic Branch: How the Courts Serve America, New York: Oxford University Press, 2006. ISBN 0-19-517443-7.
  • The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age, New York: Random House, 2004. ISBN 0-375-50800-7.
  • The Unwanted Gaze: The Destruction of Privacy in America, New York: Random House, 2000. ISBN 0-679-44546-3.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Library of Congress authority record, LCCN n 99281873 (accessed April 30, 2014)
  2. ^ http://www.davidgarrow-com.hb2hosting.net/File/DJG%202006%20LATRosenRev25June.pdf
  3. ^ a b "WEDDING/CELEBRATIONS; Christine Stolba, Jeffrey Rosen". New York Times. March 9, 2003. Retrieved 2007-11-01. 
  4. ^ Jeffrey Rosen - Brookings Institution
  5. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (March 11, 2007). "The Brain on the Stand". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  6. ^ Roberts's Rules - Magazine - The Atlantic
  7. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (September 23, 2007). "The Dissenter". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  8. ^ FORA.tv - Justice Stephen Breyer: Democracy and the Court
  9. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (October 5, 1997). "The New Look of Liberalism on the Court". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  10. ^ Jeffrey Rosen, "The Case Against Sotomayor: Indictments of Obama's front-runner to replace Souter," The New Republic, May 0, 2009, found at The New Republic website Accessed May 27, 2009.
  11. ^ 'Blog Entry' Sparks Furor Over Sotomayor : NPR
  12. ^ Jeffrey Rosen and TNR's response to critics - Glenn Greenwald - Salon.com
  13. ^ Becker, Jo; Liptak, Adam (May 29, 2009). "Sotomayor's Blunt Style Raises Issue of Temperament". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  14. ^ Savage, Charlie (July 17, 2009). "A Nominee on Display, but Not Her Views". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  15. ^ a b Rosen, Jeffrey (July 2, 2010). "Brandeis's Seat, Kagan's Responsibility". The New York Times. Retrieved July 3, 2010. 
  16. ^ Disgrace | The New Republic
  17. ^ How To Judge | The New Republic
  18. ^ Sotto Voce | The New Republic
  19. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (March 16, 2008). "Supreme Court Inc". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  20. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (April 17, 2005). "The Unregulated Offensive". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  21. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (2010-11-28) The TSA is invasive, annoying - and unconstitutional, Washington Post
  22. ^ Helft, Miguel (2010-12-10) Facebook Wrestles With Free Speech and Civility, New York Times
  23. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (April 30, 2000). "The Eroded Self". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  24. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (October 7, 2001). "A Watchful State". The New York Times Magazine. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  25. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (April 14, 2002). "Silicon Valley's Spy Game". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. [dead link]
  26. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (August 28, 2005). "Roberts v. the Future". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  27. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (March 11, 2007). "The Brain on the Stand". The New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 
  28. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (March 17, 2009). "Genetic Surveillance For All". Slate. Retrieved February 17, 2012. 
  29. ^ Rosen, Jeffrey (November 30, 2008). "Google's Gatekeepers". New York Times. Retrieved May 6, 2010. 

References[edit]

  • Rosen, Jeffrey (2004). "About the Author". The Naked Crowd: Reclaiming Security and Freedom in an Anxious Age (1st Trade Paperback ed.). New York: Random House. ISBN 0-375-75985-9. 

External links[edit]