Jeffrey Ullman

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Jeffrey D. Ullman
Born (1942-11-22) November 22, 1942 (age 71)
Citizenship American
Nationality American
Institutions Stanford University
Alma mater Columbia University
Princeton University
Thesis Synchronization Error Correcting Codes[1] (1966)
Doctoral advisor Arthur Bernstein, Archie McKellar
Doctoral students Himanshu Gupta
Surajit Chaudhuri
Kevin Karplus
David Maier
Harry Mairson
Alberto O. Mendelzon
Jeffrey F. Naughton
Anand Rajaraman
Yehoshua Sagiv
Mihalis Yannakakis
Alan J. Demers
Known for database theory, database systems, formal language theory
Notable awards Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery (1994)
ACM SIGMOD Contributions Award (1996)
ACM SIGMOD Best Paper Award (1996)
Karl V. Karlstrom outstanding educator award (1998)
Knuth Prize (2000)
ACM SIGMOD Edgar F. Codd Innovations Award (2006)
ACM SIGMOD Test of Time Award (2006)
IEEE John von Neumann Medal (2010)

Jeffrey David "Jeff" Ullman (born November 22, 1942) is a computer scientist and professor at Stanford University. His textbooks on compilers (various editions are popularly known as the Dragon Book), theory of computation (also known as the Cinderella book), data structures, and databases are regarded as standards in their fields.

Early life and career[edit]

Ullman received a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Mathematics from Columbia University in 1963 and his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Princeton University in 1966. He then worked for several years at Bell Labs. From 1969 to 1979 he was a professor at Princeton. Since 1979 he has been a professor at Stanford University, where he is currently the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor of Computer Science (Emeritus). In 1995 he was inducted as a Fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and in 2000 he was awarded the Knuth Prize. Ullman is also the co-recipient (with John Hopcroft) of the 2010 IEEE John von Neumann Medal, “For laying the foundations for the fields of automata and language theory and many seminal contributions to theoretical computer science.”[2]

Ullman's research interests include database theory, data integration, data mining, and education using the information infrastructure. He is one of the founders of the field of database theory, and was the doctoral advisor of an entire generation of students who later became leading database theorists in their own right. He was the Ph.D. advisor of Sergey Brin, one of the co-founders of Google, and served on Google's technical advisory board. He is currently the CEO of Gradiance. He teaches a course on Automata on the online learning platform Coursera.[3]

Books[edit]

  • Database Systems: The Complete Book (with H. Garcia-Molina and J. Widom), Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 2002.
  • Introduction to Automata Theory, Languages, and Computation, (with J. E. Hopcroft and R. Motwani), Addison-Wesley, Reading MA, 1969, 1979, 2000.
  • Elements of ML Programming, Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1993, 1998.
  • A First Course in Database Systems (with J. Widom), Prentice-Hall, Englewood Cliffs, NJ, 1997, 2002.
  • Foundations of Computer Science (with A. V. Aho), Computer Science Press, New York, 1992.C edition, 1994.
  • Principles of Database and Knowledge-Base Systems (two volumes), Computer Science Press, New York, 1988, 1989.
  • Compilers: Principles, Techniques, and Tools (with A. V. Aho and R. Sethi), Addison-Wesley, Reading MA, 1977, 1986.
  • Computational Aspects of VLSI, Computer Science Press, 1984
  • Data Structures and Algorithms (with A. V. Aho and J. E. Hopcroft), Addison-Wesley, Reading MA, 1983.
  • Principles of Compiler Design (with A. V. Aho), Addison-Wesley, Reading, MA, 1977.
  • Fundamental Concepts of Programming Systems, Addison-Wesley, Reading MA, 1976.
  • The Design and Analysis of Computer Algorithms (with A. V. Aho and J. E. Hopcroft), Addison-Wesley, Reading MA, 1974.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeffrey Ullman at the Mathematics Genealogy Project
  2. ^ "IEEE John von Neumann Medal Recipients". IEEE. Retrieved 2010-02-04. 
  3. ^ https://www.coursera.org/course/automata

External links[edit]