Jeffrion Aubry

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Jeffrion L. Aubry
Jeffrion Aubry 2012.jpg
Aubry in 2012
Member of the New York State Assembly
from the 35th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
1992
Preceded by Helen Marshall
Personal details
Born (1948-02-08) February 8, 1948 (age 66)[1]
New Orleans, Louisiana[1]
Political party Democratic
Children five[1]
Alma mater College of Santa Fe (now Santa Fe University of Art and Design) (1969)[2]
Website Official website

Jeffrion L. Aubry (born February 8, 1948)[1] represents District 35 in the New York State Assembly,[3] which comprises East Elmhurst, LeFrak City, and parts of Corona, Woodside, Jackson Heights and Elmhurst.[4]

Chosen in a special election in 1992,[5] Aubry ran uncontested in the 2008 and 2010 general elections.[6][7] He is the current Committee on Correction chair and a member of the Committee on Governmental Employees, Committee on Rules, Committee on Social Services and Committee on Ways and Means.[8] Assemblyman Aubry is also a member of the Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic & Asian Legislative Caucus.[8] As the Chairman of Corrections he introduced The Drug Law Reform, Drug Treatment and Crime Reduction Act of 2001,[9] also known as the reform of the Rockefeller drug laws.[10] Assemblyman Aubry stated the Rockefeller drug laws is "a failed policy that we can no longer sustain."[10] Assemblyman Aubry is also a member of the Council of State Governments and is a recognized "Toll Fellow."[11]

Assemblyman Aubry also serves as the chairman of the board of the Council of State Governments' Justice Center,[12] a national organization which provides technical assistance to states to develop data driven consensus supported criminal justice policies to reduce crime and decrease the cost of incarceration nationwide.[13]

Prior to his election to the Assembly, Aubry served in a number of capacities within city government including as the Director of Economic Development for the Office of the Borough President of Queens and as the Queens representative to the Economic Development Corporation of the City of New York. He has also served as the Chairman of the Small Business Development Center's Advisory board at York College and as a consultant for Massand Associates-an engineering firm-within the private sector.

For sixteen years he served as an employee of Elmcor Youth and Adult Activities (a not-for-profit organization[14]), holding various positions including Executive Director,[1] and was also a teacher at New Mexico State Penitentiary for Eastern New Mexico University.[1] He received a B.A. from the College of Santa Fe (now Santa Fe University of Art and Design) in 1969.[2]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "Assembly Member Jeffrion L. Aubry (NY)". Project Vote Smart. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  2. ^ a b "Jeffrion L. Aubry: Biography". New York State Assembly. Retrieved March 2, 2011. 
  3. ^ "Assembly District 35". New York State Assembly. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  4. ^ New York State Board of Elections. Who are your elected officials? (Map). Section State Assembly 35th District. http://nymap.elections.state.ny.us/nysboe/map.asp. Retrieved August 3, 2010.
  5. ^ Daniels, Lee (January 29, 1992). "Brooklyn and Queens Democrats Win Special Assembly Elections". The New York Times. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  6. ^ "Election Results 2008: New York State Legislature". The New York Times. 2008. 
  7. ^ "Election Results 2010: New York State Legislature". The New York Times. 2010. 
  8. ^ a b "Jeffrion L. Aubry: Committee Membership". New York State Assembly. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  9. ^ "The Drug Law Reform, Drug Treatment, and Crime Reduction Act of 2001". Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  10. ^ a b Peters, Jeremy (March 4, 2009). "Albany Takes Step to Repeal ’70s-Era Drug Laws". The New York Times. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  11. ^ "Toll Fellows Alumni Directory" (PDF). Council of State Governments. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  12. ^ "Board of Directors". Council of State Governments' Justice Center. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  13. ^ "About Us: Background". Council of State Governments' Justice Center. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 
  14. ^ "Mission Statement". Elmcor. Retrieved August 3, 2010. 

External links[edit]

New York Assembly
Preceded by
Helen Marshall
New York State Assembly, 35th District
1992–present
Incumbent