Jehan Mubarak

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Jehan Mubarak
Personal information
Born (1981-01-10) 10 January 1981 (age 33)
Washington, D.C., United States
Nickname Muba
Height 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m)
Batting style Left-handed
Bowling style Right arm off spin
Role Batsman
International information
National side
Test debut (cap 91) 28 July 2002 v Bangladesh
Last Test 9 December 2007 v England
ODI debut (cap 113) 27 November 2002 v South Africa
Last ODI 23 July 2013 v South Africa
Domestic team information
Years Team
2000/01–present Colombo Cricket Club
Career statistics
Competition Tests ODIs FC List A
Matches 10 40 146 189
Runs scored 254 704 7,963 5,022
Batting average 15.87 22.70 34.02 32.19
100s/50s 0/0 0/4 14/45 3/30
Top score 48 72 169 113
Balls bowled 84 129 6,550 2,345
Wickets 0 2 89 57
Bowling average 47.50 38.60 33.36
5 wickets in innings 0 0 1 2
10 wickets in match 0 n/a 0 n/a
Best bowling 0/1 1/10 6/11 5/50
Catches/stumpings 13/– 12/– 155/– 86/–
Source: CricketArchive; nhttp://www.espncricinfo.com/srilanka/content/player/49633.html, 14 August 2013

Jehan Mubarak (born 10 January 1981 in Washington, DC, United States) is an American-born Sri Lankan cricketer. He is a left-handed batsman and a right-arm offbreak bowler.

Playing career[edit]

Early career[edit]

Educated at prestigious Royal College Colombo, where he won the coveted Royal Crown for cricket and won colours in water polo. He holds a degree in Chemistry from University of Colombo.[1][2] Mubarak was initially spotted at a Cricket training camp in Dambulla by former players Arjuna Ranatunga and Aravinda de Silva, and subsequently labeled one of the brightest future stars of Sri Lankan cricket,.[3] His father is Dr A M Mubarak.

After being a prolific run scorer in school yard cricket, though only playing a handful of first class games, Mubarak was eliciting comparisons to West Indian cricket icon Brian Lara for not only his graceful batting style but also for his ability against spinners.[4]

International career[edit]

Debut[edit]

In July 2002 he made his Test debut against Bangladesh,[5] and in November 2002 he made his ODI debut against South Africa[6] and participated in the 2003 World Cup hosted by South Africa.[7]

After his debut Ranjit Fernando stated on air that Mubarak's batting was "poetry in motion" and that he should be given more responsibility in order to improve the professionalism of the Sri Lankan cricket team.[8]

Decline[edit]

In June 2005 however, three years after his debut he had failed to live up to initial expectations and was looked over for selection and has been given limited opportunities since.[9]

In February 2006, he was fined after showing dissent towards an umpire in an ODI against Bangladesh[10]

Re-emergence[edit]

In August 2007 he was rushed into the Sri Lankan Twenty20 squad following the departures of Marvan Atapattu and Russel Arnold, following man-of-the-match performances against Bangladesh.[11] He performed admirably during this tournament which included a 13-ball 46 against Kenya.[12]

In September 2007 Mubarak subsequently re-called back into the ODI squad[13] and Sri Lankan Test team[14][15] against England.

In September 2008 Mubarak performed well all-round against Hong-Kong playing for the Sri Lankan Development XI.[16]

In May 2009 Mubarak was selected as one of the overseas players of Brothers Union Chittagong for their campaign in the Habib Group Port City Cricket League (PCL) tournament being held in Chittagong, Bangladesh between 2 and 10 May 2009.[17]

Captaincy credentials[edit]

In July 2009 Mubarak was selected to captain the Sri Lanka Board XI against India.[18]

In August 2009 he scored 160 for Sri Lanka A against Pakistan A[19] and in September 2009 he captained and guided Sri Lankan domestic champions Wayamba to the Champions League in India.[20]

Future[edit]

Many commentators remarked that he had previously been treated unfairly and never given an extended run in the Sri Lankan team,[21] and this along with the enormous burden placed on him in his youth was the main reason behind his lack of consistency.[22] Cricket loving public feels he has been given more opportunities than others as he is from the same school as the Chief selector Asantha De Mel. Asantha De Mel was replaced by Aravinda De Silva in 2010.

Mubarak has also been touted as a future captain of Sri Lanka due to his handling of his team Wayamba and of the media during the Champions League in India.[23]

Swimming career[edit]

Jehan started his sporting career as a swimmer and then became a cricketer. He swam for Royal College and competed at National Level swimming competitions by representing his alma-mater. Mubarak specialized in short distance swimming and won the national championship in 50 meter butterfly stroke. In 2006–2007 Jehan swam for Sri Lanka National Swimming meet and after finishing his semi-final heat he opt out from final event to participate in Sri Lanka national cricket team practice. Mubarak also led the Royal College Water Polo team during his time at Royal College.[24]

Personal life[edit]

Mubarak was involved in an accident on 22 April 2012 while driving back from Wilpattu National Park; he was arrested as the result of a head-on collision which killed a motorcyclist.[25]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jehan Mubarak – Up close and personal". Island Cricket. Retrieved 2012-03-05. 
  2. ^ "Kelaniya S&LSA – overall champs at Gampaha District Meet". Sunday Observer. Retrieved 2008-03-30. 
  3. ^ "Mubarak waits for his window". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2004-01-27. 
  4. ^ "Jehan Mubarak". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2008-03-30. 
  5. ^ "Sri Lanka vs Bangladesh 2nd Test". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2002-07-31. 
  6. ^ "South Africa vs Sri Lanka 1st ODI". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2002-11-27. 
  7. ^ "2003 World Cup in South Africa, Sri Lanka Squad". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2003-02-09. 
  8. ^ "Fernando: 'We are not professional enough'". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2003-10-30. 
  9. ^ "Back to the drawing board for Jehan". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2005-06-29. 
  10. ^ "2006: Penalties imposed on players for breaches of ICC Code of Conduct". International Cricket Council. Retrieved 2007-01-30. 
  11. ^ "Cruising to a double whitewash". Retrieved 2007-09-05. 
  12. ^ "Kenya v Sri Lanka". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2007-09-14. 
  13. ^ "England in Sri Lanka ODI Series, 2007/08". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2007-09-18. 
  14. ^ "Sri Lanka 1st Test Squad". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2007-11-23. 
  15. ^ "Sri Lanka 2nd Test Squad". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2007-12-07. 
  16. ^ "Mubarak's all-round show leads nine-wicket rout". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2008-09-13. 
  17. ^ "Habib Group-Port city Cricket League (PCL) to starts on Saturday". Bangladesh Cricket. Retrieved 2009-05-29. 
  18. ^ "Sri Lanka Board XI v Indians". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2008-07-18. 
  19. ^ "Mubarak 160 puts Sri Lanka in charge". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2009-08-07. 
  20. ^ "Wayamba squad". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2009-09-01. 
  21. ^ "Jayawardene and Sangakarra bat on ... and on". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2007-12-22. 
  22. ^ "Mubarak: The Eternal Scapegoat". The Daily Mirror. Retrieved 2009-04-11. [dead link]
  23. ^ "Jehan Mubarak handles media with aplomb". Chennai, India: The Hindu. 7 October 2009. Retrieved 2009-10-07. 
  24. ^ "Make a Splash". Cricinfo. Retrieved 2010-10-31. 
  25. ^ "Sri Lankan cricketer Jehan Mubarak arrested over a fatal accident". LankaPage.com. Retrieved 2012-04-22. 

External links[edit]