Jelly Blubber

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Jelly Blubber
Blue Blubber Jellyfish IMGP2102.JPG
Jelly blubber in Port Phillip Bay, Australia
Scientific classification
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Cnidaria
Class: Scyphozoa
Order: Rhizostomeae
Family: Catostylidae
Genus: Catostylus
Species: C. mosaicus
Binomial name
Catostylus mosaicus
Quoy & Gaimard, 1824

The Jelly Blubber (Catostylus mosaicus), also known as the Blue Blubber Jellyfish, is a species of jellyfish from coastal regions in the Indo-Pacific. It is the most commonly encountered jellyfish along the Australian eastern coast and large swarms sometimes appear in estuarine waters.

Description[edit]

Jelly blubbers at Monterey Bay Aquarium showing two of the colour variations (blue and brown) possible in this species.

In Sydney waters, the Jelly Blubber's large bell is a creamy white or brown colour, but farther north in Australia it is usually blue.[1] The colours are derived from pigment produced by the jellyfish itself (not symbiotic algae, as in some other jellyfish).[2] There is no obvious mouth on the underside, but there are small openings on each arm, through which food is passed to the stomach.[3] The tentacles also have stinging cells that can capture tiny crustaceans and other plankton. It grows to a diameter of 30–45 cm (12–18 in).[3]

The sting can be painful but generally poses no serious risk to humans.

Blubber jellyfish at the Monterey Bay Aquarium's "Jellyfish Experience"

Distribution and habitat[edit]

This jellyfish is found in coastal parts of the Indo-Pacific. In Australia, it occurs off the coasts of Queensland, New South Wales and Victoria. It can also enter intertidal estuaries.[4]

Food[edit]

Eats mainly plankton, small fish, some crustaceans, and small particles in the ocean water.

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Catostylus mosaicus". Julian Rocks. Archived from the original on 2010-06-25. 
  2. ^ Georgia Aquarium: Blubber jelly. Animal Guide. Retrieved 25 September 2014.
  3. ^ a b "Blubber jelly". Monterey Bay Aquarium. Retrieved 2014-04-07. 
  4. ^ "Catostylus mosaicus (Quoy & Gaimard)". World Register of Marine Species. Retrieved 2014-02-14.