Jennifer Botterill

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Jennifer Botterill
Jennifer Botterill
Born (1979-05-01) May 1, 1979 (age 35)
Ottawa, ON, CAN
Height 5 ft 9 in (175 cm)
Weight 153 lb (69 kg; 10 st 13 lb)
Position Forward
Shot Left
CWHL team
Former teams
Toronto Aeros
Harvard University (19982003)
National team  Canada
Playing career 1997–2011
Website Official Site

Jennifer Botterill, OM (born May 1, 1979 in Ottawa, Ontario) is a retired women's hockey player who played for the Canadian national women's hockey team, Mississauga Chiefs and the Toronto Aeros. Her final game was the 2011 Clarkson Cup final, a 5–0 loss to the Montreal Stars. She assisted on the game-winning goal in her final international game, Canada's 2-0 win over the United States for the gold medal in the 2010 Winter Olympics.

Although born in Ottawa, Ontario, she claims a hometown of Winnipeg, Manitoba.

Playing career[edit]

Collegiate[edit]

Botterill attended Harvard University and played for the Harvard Crimson women's ice hockey program from 1998 to 2003. Harvard and several media outlets recognize Botterill as U.S. college ice hockey's career scoring leader (149 goals, 170 assists, 319 points).[1][2][3] The NCAA does not recognize her record because women's hockey was not an NCAA-sanctioned sport in Botterill's first two college seasons.[4] She scored at least one point in 106 of her 107 career college games (including a streak of 80 consecutive games). She was the first player to win the Patty Kazmaier Award twice as the top player in U.S. women's college hockey. Botterill set an NCAA record (since tied) for most points in one game with 10. This was accomplished on January 28, 2003 versus Boston College.[5]

Canadian Women's Hockey League[edit]

Botterill played for the Mississauga Chiefs and Toronto Furies of the Canadian Women's Hockey League. In 2007–08, she won the Angela James Bowl after winning the league scoring title with 61 points.[6] She was voted the CWHL Top Forward and a CWHL Central All-Star; she won CWHL Top Scorer of the Month honours in February. In 2008-09, she was a CWHL First Team All-Star.

Botterill retired after the 2010-11 season. Despite playing just three seasons in the four-year old CWHL, she retired as the league's second-best scorer with 160 points (in 79 games from 2007-08 to 2010-11). After winning the Angela James Bowl in 2007-08, she finished third in the league scoring race in both 2008-09 and 2010-11.

International[edit]

She won the silver medal in the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano in 1998 as the youngest player on the Canadian team.[7] Later, she won the gold medal in the 2002 games in Salt Lake City, Utah, at the 2006 Winter Olympics in Turin, and at the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver, playing forward. Botterill announced her retirement, on March 14, 2011.[8] Her last appearance with Team Canada was on February 25, 2010 at the 2010 Olympic Games in Vancouver. Her final point was also on February 25 when, she assisted Marie-Philip Poulin on the gold medal-winning goal.[9]

World Championship biography[edit]

1999, 2000, 2001, 2004, 2007 World Champion

2005, 2008, 2009 Silver Medallist

Awards and honors[edit]

  • Angela James Bowl, 2007–08
  • CWHL Top Forward, 2007–08
  • CWHL First All-Star Team, 2008–09
  • CWHL Central All-Stars, 2007–08

Accomplishments and notes[edit]

2008 Inductee, Women's Beanpot Hall of Fame[10]

2007–08 ESSO Canada Most Sportsmanlike Player of the Year

2006 Order of Manitoba[11]

2006 Winter Olympic All Tournament Team – Awarded by the International Ice Hockey Federation

2001[12] & 2004[13] MVP of the World Championships – Awarded by the International Ice Hockey Federation

2004 Named to the Media All Star Team at the World Championships

2001 Directorate Award, Best Forward, the World Championships

2001–02 & 2002–03 Winner of the Patty Kazmaier Award for the top female college ice hockey player in the United States. Only 2-time winner of the Award

2000–01 & 2002–03 Team Captain of Harvard University

2001 Female Athlete of the Year Award – Awarded by the Province of Manitoba (Botterill's mother, Doreen McCannell won the same award 36 years before)

1999 Captain of Canada's National Women's Under 22 Team which defeated the United States in a three game series

1999 American Women's College Hockey Alliance Women's Ice Hockey Champion

1999 Most Outstanding Player of the American Women's College Hockey Alliance Championship

1999 American Women's College Hockey Alliance All-Americans, First Team[14]\

1996 Attended Canada's National Junior Basketball selection camp

All Time Leading Scorer at Harvard University

In high school she attended the National Sport School (Canada)[15]

Bilingual – French and English

Media[edit]

Botterill is an online host for Gretzky.com.

Charitable Endeavors[edit]

Botterill is an Athlete Ambassador for Right To Play (formerly Olympic Aid).

Personal life[edit]

Botterill was born to Doreen McCannell and Cal Botterill. Her mother, Doreen, competed in the 1964 and 1968 Winter Olympics for Canada in speed skating. Her father, Cal, is a noted sports psychologist and has advised NHL teams and works with current and former Canadian Olympic athletes. Botterill's brother, Jason Botterill, competed for Canada in the World Junior Championships (3 Gold Medals) and played in the National Hockey League. He is currently the Assistant GM for the Pittsburgh Penguins. Their grandfather, Donald Grant McCannell was inducted into the Manitoba Sports Hall of Fame in 2001.[16]

She was a CAA School Safety Patroller in grade 5 and 6 in Winnipeg, Manitoba.[17]

Botterill graduated from Harvard University in 2003 with a B.A. Psychology (with Honors). On May 5, 2012, she married hockey coach Adrian Lomonaco.[18]

Career statistics – Team Canada[edit]

    Regular season  
Season Team League GP G A Pts
1997 Three Nations Cup Nat-Tm 5 1 0 1
1997–98 Pre-Olympic Tour Nat-Tm 20 3 4 7
1998 Winter Olympics – Nagano Nat-Tm 6 0 0 0
1999 Canadian Under-22 Xmas Cup Nat-Tm 6 2 3 5
1999 Finland Nat-Tm 4 0 2 2
1999 Pre-Women's World Championships Nat-Tm 3 1 1 2
1999 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 1 3 4
1999 Three Nations Cup Nat-Tm 5 3 4 7
2000 Pre-Women's World Championships Nat-Tm 2 1 3 4
2000 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 1 5 6
2000 Four Nations Cup Nat-Tm 4 3 6 9
2001 Sweden / United States Nat-Tm 2 0 1 1
2001 Pre-Women's World Championships Nat-Tm 2 0 1 1
2001 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 8 2 10
2001 Three Nations Cup Nat-Tm 4 2 1 3
2001 Pre-Olympic Tour Nat-Tm 15 6 13 19
2002 Winter Olympics – Salt Lake City Nat-Tm 5 3 3 6
2003 Four Nations Team Nat-Tm 4 1 3 4
2004 Pre-Women's World Championships Nat-Tm 1 0 3 3
2004 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 3 8 11
2005 Pre-Women's World Championships Nat-Tm 1 0 0 0
2005 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 1 6 7
2005 Four Nations Team Nat-Tm 4 1 1 2
2005 Torino TEST EVENT Nat-Tm 3 3 1 4
2005 Pre-Olympic Tour Nat-Tm 12 0 1 1
2006 Winter Olympics – Torino Nat-Tm 5 1 6 7
2006 Four Nations Team Nat-Tm 4 1 6 7
2007 Pre-Women's World Championships Nat-Tm 1 1 3 4
2007 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 3 2 5
2007 Festival Nat-Tm 2 0 2 2
2007 Four Nations Team Nat-Tm 4 5 2 7
2008 Pre-Women's World Championships Nat-Tm 1 1 0 1
2008 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 4 4 8
2008 Four Nations Team Nat-Tm 4 0 2 2
2009 Canadian World Championship Team Nat-Tm 5 5 3 8
Team Canada U22 totals 6 2 3 5
Team Canada National Team totals 162 62 102 164

Career statistics – women's club hockey[edit]

    Regular season  
2003–04 Toronto Aeros NWHL 36 30 31 61
2004–05 Toronto Aeros NWHL 29 22 33 55
2006–07 Mississauga Chiefs NWHL 21 15 19 34
2007–08 Mississauga Chiefs CWHL 26 24 37 61
2008–09 Mississauga Chiefs CWHL 28 25 30 55
Club totals 140 116 150 266

Collegiate statistics[edit]

    Regular season  
Season Team League GP G A Pts
1998–99 Harvard University AWCHA 28 37 51 88
1999–2000 Harvard University AWCHA 23 31 31 62
2000–01 Harvard University NCAA 30 42 36 78
2002–03 Harvard University NCAA 26 39 52 91
Harvard University/ECAC totals 107 149 170 319

References[edit]

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Incumbent
Angela James Bowl
2008
Succeeded by
Jayna Hefford (2009)
Preceded by
Katja Riipi (2000)
IIHF World Women's Championships Best Forward
2001
Succeeded by
Jayna Hefford (2004)
Preceded by
First awarded in 2001
IIHF World Women's Championships Most Valuable Player
2001, 2004
Succeeded by
Krissy Wendell (2005)
Preceded by
Ali Brewer (2000)
Patty Kazmaier Award
2001
Succeeded by
Brooke Whitney (2002)
Preceded by
Brooke Whitney (2002)
Patty Kazmaier Award
2003
Succeeded by
Angela Ruggiero (2004)