Jennifer Dulski

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jennifer Dulski
Jennifer Dulski.png
Residence San Francisco, Palo Alto
Nationality American
Alma mater Cornell University
Occupation President & COO, Change.org
Employer Change.org

Jennifer Dulski is a technology executive in Silicon Valley.[1] She left Google in January 2013[1] to become president and COO of Change.org, joining the ranks of other "super-successful women who have started or grown careers at Google only to jump to other Silicon Valley companies," such as Yahoo! CEO Marissa Mayer and Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg.[2]

Background[edit]

Dulski was one of the first 500 employees at Yahoo! and rose in the ranks during her 9-year tenure to eventually serve as group vice president and general manager of local and commerce, where she led a $500 million portfolio of businesses and a 500-person team. After Yahoo! she was co-founder and CEO of The Dealmap,[3] which was acquired in 2011 by Google, where she spent almost two years as a senior executive.[4]

Dulski’s first job after college was founding and running Summerbridge Pittsburgh (part of the Breakthrough Collaborative), a non-profit organization that helps underserved middle school students get on a path to college and prepares high school and college students for careers in education. She currently serves on the boards of Move, Inc.,[5] Little Passports, and the Silicon Valley site of The Breakthrough Collaborative.[6]

Dulski has been called an "instigator of change" by Forbes Magazine, which reports that "In college, when she faced issues joining the men’s rowing team as the coxswain, the position that guides the boat, she fought until she earned the opportunity for all women to cox men’s crew."[7]

At Change.org[edit]

Dulski joined Change.org after taking action on a petition started by Travyon Martin's parents. She became excited by Change.org petitions as a user and was then recruited to join the team as its new COO and president. In an interview with Business Insider, Dulski called the job "a perfect way to combine both of my passions, scaling successful Internet companies and making the world a better place."[8]

According to a 2013 interview with VentureBeat, Dulski plans to further "[Change.org's] international expansion and drive the company to be able to continue to support rapid growth and scaling."[9]

Ten months into Dulski's tenure at Change.org, a profile in The Daily Telegraph named her "the poster child for protests 2.0."[10]

Thought leadership[edit]

Dulski has become a thought leader on topics including workplace management, leadership, and being a woman in the technology industry. She says that one quality every leader should possess is empathy, telling Fortune Magazine, "I believe the best leaders are excellent at listening to those around them and synthesizing their insights into great ideas. The best leaders can put themselves in others' shoes, understanding the pain points of their customers and building products that creatively solve those problems. Strong leaders also exhibit empathy for their teams, recognizing people are motivated by different things and helping them find roles and projects that leverage their strengths and bring out their best work."[11]

An October 2013 interview in the Telegraph said Dulski advises budding social entrepreneurs to "prepare for extreme highs, and plenty of setbacks" and recommends "publicly committing to your company's mission, as you may face pressure from potential investors to sell, go public, or otherwise 'put short-term profit ahead of your vision.'"[12]

As a member of LinkedIn's Influencers program, Dulski writes blog posts on how to find a mentor, inspire employees, and make smart career choices. Her most popular post, "Don’t Work With Jerks: 5 Lessons I Learned From My Dad," garnered more than 300,000 views and 872 comments.[13]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b VanderMey, Anne (29 January 2013). "Google exec moves to Change.org". Fortune. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  2. ^ Koetsier, John (6 February 2013). "Facebook's Sheryl Sandberg, CEO of LinkedIn? Almost". VentureBeat. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  3. ^ Deleon, Nicholas (10 August 2012). "The Dealmap Brings The Daily Deal Obsession To The iPhone App Store". TechCrunch. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  4. ^ Gannes, Liz (29 January 2013). "Change.org Hires Google's Jennifer Dulski as President and COO". AllThingsD. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  5. ^ "Move (MOVE) Appoints Google's (GOOG) Jennifer Dulski to Board". StreetInsider.com. Retrieved 7 November 2013. 
  6. ^ "Serving On Boards and Risk Taking". Prendismo Collection. Prendismo, LLC. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  7. ^ Canal, Emily (11 October 2013). "How Women Are Harnessing The Power Of Change.org". Forbes. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  8. ^ Bort, Julie (2 September 2013). "Change.org's Jen Dulski Shares The Best Advice On Making A Tough Decision". Business Insider. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  9. ^ Koetsier, John (1 February 2013). "Google exec Jennifer Dulski joined Change.org to change the world — and 'pay it forward' for women leaders in tech". VentureBeat. Retrieved 27 February 2013. 
  10. ^ Farr, Christina (10 October 2013). "Meet the woman driving Change.org, the poster child for protests 2.0". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 7 November 2013. 
  11. ^ Wagner, Kurt (7 July 2013). "Brainstorm Tech Spotlight: Jennifer Dulski, President and COO of Change.org". Fortune. Retrieved 6 November 2013. 
  12. ^ Farr, Christina (10 October 2013). "Meet the woman driving Change.org, the poster child for protests 2.0". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 7 November 2013. 
  13. ^ Dulski, Jen. "Don’t Work With Jerks: 5 Lessons I Learned From My Dad". LinkedIn. Retrieved 6 November 2013.