Jennifer Summit

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Jennifer Summit (born 1965) is an American scholar of Medieval and Renaissance English Literature and Professor of English at Stanford University.[1] Summit is the Eleanor Loring Ritch University Fellow in Undergraduate Education at Stanford and was Chair of the Stanford English Department between 2008 and 2011.[citation needed]

History[edit]

A graduate of Los Altos High School (Los Altos, California), Professor Summit received her BA from Vassar College in 1987[1] where she graduated with highest honors and Phi Beta Kappa.[citation needed] She was awarded a PhD by The Johns Hopkins University in 1995.[citation needed]

Summit joined the Stanford faculty in 1995 and was granted tenure in 2001.[citation needed]

Summit's work has been supported by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the American Council of Learned Societies and the Stanford Humanities Center. She received the Dean's Award for Distinguished Teaching in 1998.[citation needed]

Her most recent book, Memory's Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England (2008), was awarded the Roland H. Bainton Book Prize by the Sixteenth Century Society and Conference (SCSC)[2] and the John Ben Snow Foundation Book Prize from the North American Conference on British Studies (NCBS).[3]Her first book, Lost Property: the Woman Writer and English Literary History, 1380-1589, was published in 2000.

Professor Summit's research interests bridge the medieval and early modern periods and focus on the histories of reading, literature, and knowledge, with a special interest in literacy and the disciplines today.

Summit is the daughter of Roger K. Summit, founder of Dialog Information Services and Virginia M. Summit, author and current mayor of Los Altos Hills, CA.[citation needed]

Published Works[edit]

  • Memory's Library: Medieval Books in Early Modern England (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2008) ISBN 0-226-78171-2
  • Lost Property: the Woman Writer and English Literary History, 1380-1589 (Chicago: Univ. of Chicago Press, 2000) ISBN 0-226-78013-9
  • The History of British Women's Writing, 1500-1610: Vol 2 (Palgrave, 2010) co-edited with Caroline Bicks (Boston College) ISBN 0-230-21834-2
  • "Rethinking Periodization," a special issue of the Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Duke, 2007) co-edited with David Wallace (U. Penn) ASIN B0021WUW08

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Zhang, Justine (March 7, 2012). "Renaissance woman". Stanford Daily. Retrieved October 19, 2013. 
  2. ^ "Roland H. Bainton Prizes". Sixteenth Century Society & Conference. Retrieved October 19, 2013. 
  3. ^ "John Ben Snow Prize". North American Conference on British Studies. Retrieved October 19, 2013. 

External links[edit]