Jeremiah Markland

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Jeremiah Markland (October 18 (or 29) 1693 – July 7, 1776) was an English classical scholar.

Life[edit]

He was born at Childwall in Liverpool on the 29th (or 18th) of October 1693. He was educated at Christ's Hospital and Peterhouse, Cambridge.[1]

He left Cambridge in 1728 to act as private tutor to the son of W. Strode of Punsbourn, Hertfordshire, returning to the university in 1733. At a later date he lived at Twyford, and in 1744 went to Uckfield, Sussex, in order to superintend the education of the son of his former pupil, Mr. Strode. In 1752 he fixed his abode at Milton Court, near Dorking, Surrey, and remained there, living in great privacy, to the end of his days.[2]

He died at Milton, near Dorking.

Works[edit]

His most important works are

  • Epistola critica (1723)
  • the Sylvae of Statius (1728)
  • notes to the editions of Lysias by Taylor, of Maximus of Tyre by Davies, of Euripides's Hippolytus by Musgrave
  • editions of Euripides's Supplices, Iphigenia in Tauride and in Aulide (ed. T. Gaisford 1811)
  • Remarks on the Epistles of Cicero to Bruins (1745).

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Jeremiah Markland (MRKT710J)". A Cambridge Alumni Database. University of Cambridge. 
  2. ^ Sutton 1893.
Attribution

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domainSutton, Charles William (1893). "Markland, Jeremiah". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography 36. London: Smith, Elder & Co. 

Sources[edit]