Jeroen Krabbé

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Jeroen Krabbé
Jeroen Krabbé.png
Jeroen Krabbé in 1992
Born Jeroen Aart Krabbé
(1944-12-05) 5 December 1944 (age 69)
Amsterdam, Netherlands
Occupation Actor, director
Years active 1963–2013
Spouse(s) Herma Krabbé (1964–present)
Children 3

Jeroen Aart Krabbé (Dutch pronunciation: [jəˈrun ˈaːrt krɑˈbeː] (born 5 December 1944), is a Dutch actor and director, who has appeared in many Dutch and international films.

Early life[edit]

Krabbé was born into an artistic family in Amsterdam, Netherlands, the son of Margreet (née Reiss), a Jewish film translator, and Maarten Krabbé, a painter.[1] He has two brothers: Tim, a journalist, novelist and former championship chess player, and Mirko, an artist.

Career[edit]

Internationally, he first came to prominence in fellow Dutchman Paul Verhoeven's films Soldier of Orange opposite Rutger Hauer and The Fourth Man with Renée Soutendijk.

His first big American film was the Whoopi Goldberg comedy Jumpin' Jack Flash. However, it was his roles as villains in a string of international films from the late 1980s and early 1990s which brought him international stardom, with notable roles such as Losado in No Mercy (1986), General Georgi Koskov in the James Bond film The Living Daylights (1987), Gianni Franco in The Punisher (1989), Herbert Woodruff (Lowenstein's husband) in The Prince of Tides (1991), and Dr. Charles Nichols in The Fugitive (1993). He has also appeared in numerous TV productions, and as Satan in the TV production Jesus.

He was both director and producer of a 1998 film about Orthodox Jews during the 1970s in Antwerp (Belgium) co-starring Isabella Rossellini and Maximilian Schell called Left Luggage, as well as the Harry Mulisch novel adapted into film The Discovery of Heaven. Left Luggage was entered into the 48th Berlin International Film Festival.[2] The following year, he was a member of the jury at the 49th Berlin International Film Festival.[3]

His television work included playing an uncanny psychic in the Midsomer Murders series 11 episode "Talking to the Dead".

Personal life[edit]

He has been married to his wife Herma, since 1964. Together, they have three sons, Martijn (who is a radio and television presenter), Jasper and Jacob.

Apart from acting and directing, he is an accomplished artist (his paintings have graced Dutch postage stamps) and has co-authored a Dutch cookbook. In November 2004, he released the book Schilder, which is an overview of his paintings.

Filmography[edit]

Krabbé in 1983.

Actor[edit]

Director[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Het eenvoudige kookboek (with Marjan Berk)
  • Schilder

References[edit]

  1. ^ Jeroen Krabbe Biography (1944–). filmreference.com
  2. ^ "Berlinale: 1998 Prize Winners". berlinale.de. Retrieved 2012-01-21. 
  3. ^ "Berlinale: 1999 Juries". berlinale.de. Retrieved 2012-01-28. 

External links[edit]