Jerry Markham

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Jerry W. Markham is a Professor at the Florida International University College of Law,[1] and a legal scholar on business organizations and securities regulation in the United States. He has been quoted or cited as an expert on the regulation of financial and commodities markets in a wide variety of news sources,[2] and his three-volume collection, A Financial History of the United States, has also been cited authoritatively.[3]

Education and professional activities[edit]

Markham received a B.S. from Western Kentucky University,[1] and attended law school at the University of Kentucky College of Law,[1] where he served as Editor-in-Chief of the Kentucky Law Journal, and was named to the Order of the Coif.[1] He later received an LL.M. from the Georgetown University Law Center.[1]

Before entering academia, Markham was secretary and counsel, Chicago Board Options Exchange, Inc.;[1] chief counsel, Division of Enforcement, United States Commodity Futures Trading Commission;[1] an attorney for the Securities and Exchange Commission,[1] and a partner with the international firm of Rogers & Wells (now Clifford Chance) in Washington, D.C.[1]

Scholarship[edit]

Markham has written and taught in the areas of corporate finance, banking, commodities trading, securities and international trade law.[1] He is currently a professor of law at the Florida International University College of Law.[1] Markham was previously a member of the law faculty at the University of North Carolina, where he taught for twelve years,[1] and prior to that was an adjunct professor at the Georgetown University Law Center for ten years.[1]

Markham authored a three-volume financial history of the United States that was selected as a Choice Outstanding Academic Title in 2002. He has co-authored four casebooks on corporate law and banking regulation, has published a two-volume treatise and a history book on the law of commodity futures regulation,[1] and was the principal coauthor of a two-volume treatise on securities regulation.[1] More recently, he authored a book on the Enron and other financial scandals that followed the market downturn in 2000.

Markham has been a lecturer at the Université Jean Moulin in Lyon, France, and also has lectured in Sydney, Warsaw, Beijing, Mexico City, Montevideo, Fukuoka, and Bangkok. [1]

Works[edit]

Treatises[edit]

  • The History of Commodity Futures Trading and Its Regulation (1987)
  • A Financial History of the United States (2002; in three volumes)
  • A Financial History of Modern U.S. Corporate Scandals: From Enron to Reform (2006)
  • Broker Dealer Operations Under Securities and Commodities Law (1995; with Thomas Lee Hazen)
  • Broker-dealer Operations and Regulation Under Securities and Commodities Laws (2002; with Thomas Lee Hazen)

Textbooks[edit]

  • Commodities Regulation: Fraud, Manipulation & Other Claims (1987; Clark Boardman Callaghan)
  • Mergers, Acquisitions and Other Business Combinations: Cases and Materials (2003; with Thomas Lee Hazen)
  • Corporations and Other Business Enterprises: Cases and Materials (2003, 2006; with Thomas Lee Hazen)
  • Regulation of Bank Financial Service Activities: Cases and Materials (2004; with Lissa Lamkin Broome)
  • Corporate Finance: Cases and Materials (2004; with Thomas Lee Hazen)

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p Biography of Jerry W. Markham from the Florida International University College of Law.
  2. ^ * Andrew Longstreth (Alden Bentley, editor), "CFTC faces high hurdles in oil manipulation case", Reuters (May 26, 2011) (citing Markham as a former chief counsel of the enforcement division of the Commodity Futures Trading Commission).
    • Jonathan Leff and Robert Gibbons, "Analysis: Commodities margins: art, science or politics?", Reuters (May 12, 2011) (citing Markham as "a professor of law at the Florida International University at Miami and an expert on commodity market regulation").
    • Asjylyn Loder (Dan Stets, editor), "Commodity Manipulation May Be Easier to Prove After Overhaul", BusinessWeek (July 19, 2010) (citing Markham as "a professor at Florida International University law school in Miami and an expert witness").
    • Howard Gold, "Wall Street didn't hear Obama's greed message", MarketWatch (January 23, 2009) (citing Markham as "a professor at Florida International University College of Law and an expert on banking and securities law").
    • Alison Fitzgerald and John Brinsley, "Treasury Seeks Asset-Buying Power Unchecked by Courts", Bloomberg (September 21, 2008) (citing Markham as a law professor and author of A Financial History of the United States).
    • Ann Therese Palme, "A Guide to Walking Right", Registered Rep (February 1, 2004) (citing "Jerry W. Markham, Professor of Law, Florida International University, and Thomas L. Hazen, Professor of Law, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, authors of: Broker Dealer Operations Under Securities and Commodities Law: Financial Responsibilities, Credit Regulation, and Customer Protection, West Group, 2002").
    • Ann Therese Palmer, "The Non-Compete Trap: No Longer the Jaws of Death", Registered Rep (June 1, 2003) (citing Markham as "a University of North Carolina securities professor and co-author of a 1,500-page securities law treatise").
    • Scott Andron, "Food Lion Back In Courtroom", Greensboro News and Record (Feb 15, 1998) (citing Markham as "a law professor at UNC Chapel Hill and former lawyer for the Securities and Exchange Commission").
    • Eric N. Berg, "Chicago Board Acts on Its Timing", New York Times (March 4, 1989) (citing Markham as "a leading Washington-based commodities lawyer").
  3. ^ * Barry Critchley, "TD may join ABCP bailout", Financial Post (April 1, 2011) (stating: "If Dodge wants some ammunition to his argument, he may like to reread Chapter 3 of A Financial History of the United States, Volume II. Written by Professor Jerry Markham, the chapter shows the leadership of the legendary J.P. Morgan in the U.S. Financial Panic of 1907. Morgan got the major U.S. banks to agree to a bailout of several trusts that were suffering runs by depositors, who feared the loss of their money when the net assets within the trusts were becoming impaired in value. 'Morgan locked the financiers in his library until they agreed to provide even more funds to stop the panic,' Markham said").
    • Alison Fitzgerald and John Brinsley, "Treasury Seeks Asset-Buying Power Unchecked by Courts", Bloomberg (September 21, 2008) (citing Markham as a law professor and author of A Financial History of the United States).
    • David S. Cloud, "Confidence In Futures Markets Under Construction", News-Journal (Apr 4, 1989) (stating: "According to Jerry Markham, author of The History of Commodities Futures Trading, in one year alone - 1868 - at the Chicago Board of Trade, 'there were three corners in wheat, two in corn, one in oats, one attempted corner in rye, and another threatened in rye.'").
    • Alan Rappeport, "JP Morgan Returns to Its Rescue Roots", CFO.com Magazine (March 18, 2008) (stating: "In A Financial History of the United States, Jerry Markham calls Morgan a "one man Federal Reserve Bank" for his heroics during the panic of 1907").

External links[edit]