Jesse Crain

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Jesse Crain
Jesse Crain on August 8, 2011.jpg
Crain with the Chicago White Sox
Free agent
Relief pitcher
Born: (1981-07-05) July 5, 1981 (age 33)
Toronto, Ontario
Bats: Right Throws: Right
MLB debut
August 5, 2004 for the Minnesota Twins
Career statistics
(through 2013 season)
Win–loss record 45–30
Earned run average 3.05
Strikeouts 440
Teams
Career highlights and awards

Jesse Alan Crain (born July 5, 1981) is a Canadian professional baseball pitcher who is a free agent. He has played in Major League Baseball (MLB) for the Minnesota Twins and Chicago White Sox.

High school and college[edit]

Crain was born in Toronto, Ontario, Canada and attended Fairview High School in Boulder, Colorado, where he played baseball, basketball, and football. He was named 1999 All-State and Colorado High School Player of the Year. He was a 2001 graduate of San Jacinto Junior College in Texas, where he was an All-Conference shortstop. In 2002, he transferred to the University of Houston and was named to the all-conference team as a shortstop and relief pitcher, the all-conference tournament team as a shortstop,[1] and the conference all-academic team. He was named first team All-America by Baseball America and Baseball Weekly and second team All-America by the ABCA.

Minor leagues[edit]

Crain was drafted and signed in 2002, playing at the rookie level, and low-A minor league levels going 3–2 (wins/losses) with an 0.99 Earned Run Average combined. In 2003, he managed to pitch at all three levels in the minor leagues, going 6–3 with a 3.00 ERA. In 2004 he pitched with the AAA-ball Rochester Red Wings and went 3–2 with a 2.49 ERA before being called up by the Minnesota Twins.

Major leagues[edit]

Minnesota Twins[edit]

Crain pitching for the Twins in 2006.

Crain was called up by the Minnesota Twins in early August 2004, going 3–0 with a 2.00 ERA. In 2005 he made the major league roster. Starting the season 8–0, he set a record for most consecutive wins in relief to start a career.

On May 17, 2007, Crain was placed on the 15-day disabled list with a torn rotator cuff and labrum. He missed the rest of the season after undergoing surgery.

Crain returned to the team in 2008. He stepped up, along with Craig Breslow, to fill the eighth-inning setup role formerly occupied by Pat Neshek, who was placed on the 60-day disabled list on May 29 with an acute tear of the ulnar collateral ligament in his throwing arm. He went 5–4 for the season, with a 3.59 ERA in 66 games.

Chicago White Sox[edit]

After the 2010 season, Crain signed a three-year contract with the Chicago White Sox.[2]

Crain was used as the setup man for 2013. From April 17 to June 22, Crain pitched 29 straight scoreless appearances, a franchise record. On July 3, Crain was placed on the disabled list with a right shoulder strain.[3] In 38 games with Chicago, Crain went 2-3 with 19 holds and a 0.74 ERA, striking out 46 in 36.2 innings. Crain was elected to the All-Star Game, but since he was injured, he was replaced by Justin Masterson.

Tampa Bay Rays[edit]

Crain was traded to the Tampa Bay Rays on July 29, 2013, for future considerations.[4] Crain was activated off the disabled list on September 23,[5] but he did not appear in the regular or post season. On October 16, the compensation for the White Sox in the trade was named as minor-leaguers Sean Bierman and Ben Kline.

Houston Astros[edit]

On December 31, 2013, he agreed to terms on a one-year contract with the Houston Astros.[6] He was placed on the 60-day DL on March 21st.[7] He did not play a single game for the Astros.

World Baseball Classic[edit]

Crain was selected to represent Canada at the World Baseball Classic. In the first game of the 2006 edition of the Classic, Crain came into the game in the 9th inning. He got the save as Canada beat the South Africans 11–8.

In the 2009 World Baseball Classic, Crain struck out all four batters he faced in the eighth and ninth innings. Canada ended up losing the game to Italy.[8]

References[edit]

External links[edit]