Jewang Ungi

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Jewang Ungi
Hangul 제왕운기
Hanja
Revised Romanization Jewang un-gi
McCune–Reischauer Chewang un'gi

The Jewang Un'gi, or Songs of Emperors and Kings, is a historical poem composed by Yi Seung-hyu (李承休) in 1287, in the late Goryeo period. Comprising two volumes, it depicts the history of Korea from Dangun to King Chungnyeol, and is the second-oldest text recounting the legend of Dangun.[1] The title is sometimes alternatively translated Rhymed Chronicles of Emperors and Kings.

Yi composed the text after retiring from government service to the Cheoneunsa monastery on Duta-san mountain in Samcheok, in present-day Gangwon province.[2]

The first edition of the work was printed in 1295-1296 in Jinju, while Yi was still alive. Both extant texts, however, are from a revised woodcut edition printed in 1360 in Gyeongju. On April 1, 1965, the version kept in Uiwang city was designated South Korean National Treasure No. 418.[3] Another version, held at the Samseong Museum of Publishing in Seoul, was designated National Treasure No. 1091 in 1991.[4]

Structure[edit]

The Jewang Ungi consists of two volumes, both written in seven-character verse; the first deals with the history of China from the earliest years to the Jin Dynasty (1115–1234), and the second covers Korean history from Dangun to King Chungnyeol.[5] The second volume is divided into two parts, the first covering Korean history from Gojoseon to the Later Three Kingdoms period in 264 lines of seven-character verse, and second covering the Goryeo dynasty in five-character verse.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=AVw_C0SZkZ4C&pg=PA56
  2. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=mJwzAQAAIAAJ
  3. ^ Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea. "Treasure 418". Retrieved 2013-12-17. 
  4. ^ Cultural Heritage Administration of Korea. "Treasure 1091". Retrieved 2013-12-17. 
  5. ^ http://books.google.com/books?id=TYKNdiDCGLAC&pg=PA107