Jewish angelic hierarchy

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For other angelic hierarchies, see Hierarchy of angels.

Angels in Judaism (angel: Hebrew: מַלְאָךְmal’āḵ, plural mal’āḵīm) appear throughout the Hebrew Bible, Talmud, Rabbinic literature, and traditional Jewish liturgy. They are categorized in different hierarchies.

Maimonides[edit]

Maimonides, in his Mishneh Torah or Yad ha-Chazakah: Yesodei ha-Torah, counts ten ranks of angels in the Jewish angelic hierarchy, beginning from the highest:

Rank Angelic Class Notes
1 Chayot HaKodesh[1] See Ezekiel chs. 1 and 10
2 Ophanim See Ezekiel chs. 1 and 10
3 Erelim See Isaiah 33:7
4 Hashmallim See Ezekiel 1:4
5 Seraphim See Isaiah 6
6 Malakim Messengers, angels
7 Elohim "Godly beings"
8 Bene Elohim "Sons of Godly beings"
9 Cherubim See Talmud Hagigah 13b
10 Ishim "manlike beings", see Genesis 18:2, Daniel 10:5

Kabbalah[edit]

The Sephirot in Jewish Kabbalah
Keter Binah Chokhmah Da'at Gevurah Chesed Tiferet Hod Netzach Yesod MalkuthThe Sefirot in Jewish Kabbalah
View the image description page for this diagram Category:Sephirot

According to the Golden Dawn's interpretation of the Kabbalah, there are ten archangels, each commanding one of the choirs of angels and corresponding to one of the Sephirot. It is similar to the Jewish angelic hierarchy.[2]

Rank Choir of Angels Translation Archangel Sephirah
1 Hayot Ha Kodesh Holy Living Ones Metatron Keter
2 Ophanim Wheels Raziel Chokmah
3 Erelim Brave ones[3] Tzaphkiel Binah
4 Hashmallim Glowing ones, Amber ones[4] Tzadkiel Chesed
5 Seraphim Burning Ones Khamael Gevurah
6 Malakim Messengers, angels Raphael Tipheret
7 Elohim Godly Beings Hagiel Netzach
8 Bene Elohim Sons of Elohim Michael Hod
9 Cherubim [5] Gabriel Yesod
10 Ashim Men (man-like beings, phonetically similar to "fires") Sandalphon Malkuth

See also[edit]

References[edit]

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