Jia Qinglin

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Jia Qinglin
贾庆林
Jia Qinglin.jpg
7th Chairman of the National Committee of the CPPCC
In office
March 2003 – March 2013
Deputy Wang Gang
Preceded by Li Ruihuan
Succeeded by Yu Zhengsheng
Member of the 16,17th CPC Politburo Standing Committee
In office
15 November 2002 – 15 November 2012
General Secretary Hu Jintao
Member of the
National People's Congress
Incumbent
Assumed office
15 March 1993
Constituency Fujian At-large (93–98)
Beijing At-large (98-)
CPC Beijing Committee Secretary
In office
1997–2002
Deputy Liu Qi
Preceded by Wei Jianxing
Succeeded by Liu Qi
Personal details
Born March 1940 (age 74)
Botou, Hebei
Nationality Chinese
Political party Communist Party of China
Spouse(s) Lin Youfang
Alma mater Hebei University of Technology
Profession Engineer
Jia Qinglin
Simplified Chinese 贾庆林
Traditional Chinese 賈慶林

Jia Qinglin (born March 1940 in Botou, Hebei) was a senior leader of the People's Republic of China. He was the fourth ranking member of the Politburo Standing Committee of the Communist Party of China, the Chairman and Party secretary of the National Committee of the People's Political Consultative Conference.[1] Jia's functions as the head of China's consultative legislative body are largely ceremonial in nature.

Earlier he had served as the CPC Party Chief in Fujian and Beijing.[2][3] [4]

Political career[edit]

An engineer by profession, and one of former General Secretary Jiang Zemin's trusted allies and protégés, Jia Qinglin's rise in the politburo is attributed to his relationship with Jiang. Jia served as the Party chief in Fujian in the early 1990s. He was later transferred to Beijing in 1996 to replace then Beijing Party-chief Chen Xitong who was arrested on corruption charges. Jia served as the acting Mayor, Mayor and Party Chief in Beijing, coming onto the national and international spotlight during the 50th Anniversary of PRC celebrations as the event's host.[2][5]

At the national level[edit]

Because of his high local position and his ties with then-General Secretary Jiang Zemin, in November 2002 Jia became the fourth-ranking member of the 16th Politburo Standing Committee (PSC) of the Communist Party of China.[6] Although his ceremonial role as the Chairman of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference, a quasi-consultative upper house in China's political system, makes him fourth in the order of precedence, it is widely accepted that the position has very little power, perhaps the least amount of power in the nine PSC members. Jia Qinglin was the most senior Chinese official to attend the funeral of Zhao Ziyang. With the transition of authority to Hu Jintao in 2005, Jia appears to have been given the job of coordinating policy on Taiwan.[2][7]

Jia was reelected to the 17th Politburo Standing Committee during the CPC 17th national congress, a move that analysts predicted partly because of Jia's loyalty to his patron, former party general secretary Jiang Zemin.

Career timeline[edit]

1956–1958: Student majoring in industrial enterprise planning at Shijiazhuang Industrial Management School.

1958–1962: Student majoring in electric motor and appliance design and manufacture of the Department of Electric Power of Hebei institution of Technology (now Hebei University of Technology).

1962–1969: Technician of the Complete Plant Bureau of the First Machine-Building Industry Ministry and deputy secretary of its CYLC organization.

1969–1971: Did manual work in the 7 May Cadre School of the First Machine-Building Industry Ministry in Fengxin County, Jiangxi Province.

1971–1973: Technician of the Policy Research Office of the General Office of the First Machine-Building Industry Ministry.

1973–1978: Chief of the Product Management Bureau of the First Ministry of Machine-building Industry.

1978–1983: General manager of China National Machinery and Equipment Import and Export Corporation.

1983–1985: Director of Taiyuan Heavy Machinery Plant and secretary of its Party committee.

1985–1986: Member of the Standing Committee of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee and its deputy secretary.

1986–1988: Deputy secretary of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee and head of the Organization Department of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee.

1988–1990: Deputy secretary of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee, president of the Party School of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee and secretary of the Work Committee of Departments under the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee.

1990–1991: Deputy secretary of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee, deputy governor and acting governor of Fujian Province.

1991–1993: Deputy secretary of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee and governor of Fujian Province.

1993–1994: Secretary of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee and governor of Fujian Province.

1994–1996: Secretary of the CPC Fujian Provincial Committee and chairman of the Standing Committee of the Fujian Provincial People's Congress.

1996–1997: Deputy secretary of the CPC Beijing Municipal Committee, vice-mayor, acting mayor and mayor of Beijing.

1997–1999: Member of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee, secretary of the CPC Beijing Municipal Committee and mayor of Beijing.

1999–2002: Member of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee and secretary of the CPC Beijing Municipal Committee.

2002–2012: Member of the Standing Committee of the Political Bureau of the CPC Central Committee.

March 2003: Elected chairman of the 10th National Committee of the Chinese People's Political Consultative Conference.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michael Sainsbury (10 March 2011). "JULIA Gillard will meet the implications of China's military rise head-on in her first visit to Beijing as Prime Minister next month.". The Australian. 
  2. ^ a b c "People's Daily Online". People's Daily. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  3. ^ "Who's Who in China's Leadership". China.org.cn. 23 October 2007. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  4. ^ "Biography of Jia Qinglin". China Vitae. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  5. ^ "The Chinese Central Government's Official Web Portal". Gov.cn. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 
  6. ^ BBC News http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/shared/spl/hi/in_depth/china_politics/leadership/html/5.stm |url= missing title (help). 
  7. ^ "Jia Qinglin, Jia Qinglin, who's who in china, China's Celebrities, China Government Officials, Famous Chinese". Chinatoday.com. 22 October 2007. Retrieved 22 March 2012. 

External links[edit]

Political offices
Preceded by
Wang Zhaoguo
Governor of Fujian
1990–1994
Succeeded by
Chen Mingyi
Preceded by
Li Qiyan
Mayor of Beijing
1996–1999
Succeeded by
Liu Qi
Preceded by
Li Ruihuan
Chairman of the National Committee of the CPPCC
2003-2013
Succeeded by
Yu Zhengsheng
Party political offices
Preceded by
Chen Guangyi
CPC Fujian Committee Secretary
1993–1996
Succeeded by
Chen Mingyi
Preceded by
Wei Jianxing
CPC Beijing Committee Secretary
1997–2002
Succeeded by
Liu Qi
Order of precedence
Preceded by
Wen Jiabao
Premier
4th Rank of the Communist Party of China
17th Politburo Standing Committee
Succeeded by
Li Changchun
Propaganda Chairman
4th Rank of the Communist Party of China
16th Politburo Standing Committee
Succeeded by
Zeng Qinghong
Vice President