Jillian Ellis

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Jillian Ellis
Personal information
Full name Jillian Ellis
Date of birth (1966-09-06) September 6, 1966 (age 47)
Place of birth Portsmouth, England, United Kingdom
Youth career
Years Team
1984–87 College of William and Mary
Teams managed
Years Team
1988–90 North Carolina State University (assistant)
1994–96 University of Maryland (assistant)
1996–97 University of Virginia (assistant)
1997–99 University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign
1999–2010 University of California at Los Angeles
2000,2005 United States U-21
2007,2009–2010 United States U-20
2008,2011–2012 United States (assistant)
2010– USSF Development Director
2012,2014 United States (interim)
2014– United States

Jillian Ellis (born September 9, 1966) is the head coach of United States women's national soccer team, and a United States Soccer Federation's development director. Ellis was appointed head coach on May 16, 2014.[1] Prior to this appointment she served as interim head coach, following the removal of Tom Sermanni as head coach.[2] Ellis also served as interim coach of United States women, following an early departure of Pia Sundhage, in October 2012, for the head coach position of Sweden women's national football team.[3] As development director Ellis oversees United States youth soccer teams development program. She also served as head coach for various United States national youth teams, and university teams over the years.[4]

Education and youth competition[edit]

Jillian Ellis earned a Bachelors of Arts degree in English Literature and Composition at the College of William and Mary in 1988. A forward during her playing days at William and Mary from 1984–87, Ellis was a Third-Team All-American in 1987. In 1984, Ellis helped Braddock Road in Virginia to the Under-19 club national championship.[4]

Coaching and administrative career[edit]

Jillian Ellis has an USSF “A” coaching license; with coaching experiences that includes multiple stints for the under-20 and under-21 national teams, and an impressive UCLA Bruins record as a coach.[4][5][3][6][7] She is the Development Director of United States Soccer Federation. She served as assistant coach of the women's national team, head coach of a number of women youth teams, and was the interim coach of the senior women's national team in 2012,[4] and for 2 matches in 2014. She was appointed the permanent head coach of United States women in May 2014.

College teams manager[edit]

Ellis served as an assistant coach for three universities: at University of Maryland for three years, 1994–96; at University of Virginia for one year, 1996–97; and at North Carolina State University for another three years, 1988-90. As an assistant coach at N.C. State, Ellis helped the Wolfpack secure the 1988 Atlantic Coast Conference title and a NCAA Final Four appearance.[4]

Ellis headed the University of Illinois women's soccer program for two years, 1997–1999. In 1998, she brought the Illinois Fighting Illini to a 12-8 record and a first-ever Big Ten Tournament berth.[4]

Ellis led University of California, Los Angeles, to eight NCAA Final Fours, including seven in a row from 2003-2009, and won six straight Pacific-12 Conference titles from 2003-2008. She finishes her time in Westwood with a record of 229 wins, 45 losses and 14 draws (229–45–14). She was the 2000 NSCAA National Coach of the Year after leading the Bruins to the NCAA Final in just her second season as head coach.[4] B. J. Snow, the husband of former national team member Lindsay Tarpley, followed Ellis as the head coach of UCLA.[8][9]

Jillian Ellis has an impressive all-time collegiate coaching record of 248 wins, 63 losses and 14 draws (248–63–14), compiled over 14 years at 2 colleges: Illinois Fighting Illini and UCLA Bruins.[4][8]

National youth teams manager[edit]

Ellis was the head coach of the United States under-21 women's national soccer teams coaching a team to win the Nordic Cup title at Germany 2000; and also coached a team to Sweden 2005 Nordic Cup. In another stint as youth team's head coach, she guided the U.S. under-20 women’s national team to the CONCACAF title in 2010 and to the FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup in Germany.

National Development Director[edit]

Ellis joined U.S. Soccer full-time after a highly successful 12-year run as the head women’s soccer coach for the UCLA Bruins. Jill Ellis was appointed by U.S. Soccer as Development Director for the U.S. women's national teams in January 2011. The appointment, along with April Heinrichs as Technical Director, marks the first time U.S. Soccer had appointed full-time positions to oversee the programs of national women's youth teams, and their overall development.[10]

As Development Director, Ellis interacts directly with coaches within the youth club leagues, and guides the U.S. under-17, under-15 and under-14 teams.[4][10]

National team manager[edit]

Ellis was a scout for the U.S. women's national team, at the Sydney 2000 Olympics; and served as an assistant coach under Pia Sundhage when the U.S. women’s national team won the gold medal at the Beijing 2008 Olympics. Following the early departure of head coach Pia Sundhage for Sweden women's national football team, Ellis served as the interim head coach until Tom Sermanni was hired as the full-time head coach.[4][3][11]

At the time of her appointment to interim coach in 2012, Ellis was the assistant coach to Sundhage; and the Development Director of the United States women's national team program.

Ellis first appearances as head coach of United States women's national soccer team were against the Germany women's national football team, on October 20, 2012 at Bridgeview, Illinois and on October 23 at Hartford, Connecticut; two international friendly matches in a series organised to celebrate the winning of the gold medal at the London 2012 Olympics' women's football tournament.[3] The first match finished at 1–1 and the second at 2–2.

On October 30 of 2012, U.S. Soccer Federation announced that starting January 1, 2013, Tom Sermanni would be the head coach of the United States women's national soccer team; Ellis remained interim coach till the end of 2012.[12]

With a match against China women's national football team on December 15 of 2012, Jillian Ellis completed her first tenure as interim head coach of U.S. Women's National Team, with 5 wins, 2 draws, and no loss.

On April 6, 2014, U.S. Soccer Federation announced the firing of Tom Sermanni and the re-appointment of Ellis as interim head coach of the United States women's national soccer team.[2] As interim head coach in 2014 Ellis had a 3–0 win against China, and a 1–1 draw with Canada.

On May 16, 2014, U.S. Soccer announced that Ellis had been appointed as the national team's head coach on a permanent basis.[1]

Record as interim coach in 2012[edit]

Date Location Opponent FIFA
Rank
Result Competition
October 20, 2012[m 1] United StatesBridgeview, Illinois  Germany
2

5050.01005 1–1 D

International Friendly / Fan Tribute Tour
October 22, 2012[m 2] United StatesEast Hartford, Connecticut  Germany
2

5050.02005 2–2 D

International Friendly / Fan Tribute Tour
November 28, 2012[m 3] United StatesPortland, Oregon  Republic of Ireland
34

5550.05005 5–0 W

International Friendly / Fan Tribute Tour
December 1, 2012[m 4] United StatesGlendale, Arizona  Republic of Ireland
34

5250.02005 2–0 W

International Friendly / Fan Tribute Tour
December 8, 2012[m 5] United StatesDetroit, Michigan  China PR
17

5250.02005 2–0 W

International Friendly / Fan Tribute Tour
December 12, 2012[m 6] United StatesHouston, Texas  China PR
17

5450.04005 4–0 W

International Friendly / Fan Tribute Tour
December 15, 2012[m 7] United StatesBoca Raton, Florida  China PR
17

5350.04005 4–1 W

International Friendly / Fan Tribute Tour

Personal life[edit]

Jillian grew up in Portsmouth, England and migrated to the United States in 1981 at the age of 15; and had lived in Singapore for 2 years where her father, the legendary soccer coach John Ellis was developing national soccer program for Singapore.[4] Jillian Ellis currently lives in Los Angeles, California. Her father John Ellis was a longtime soccer ambassador for the British government, assigned to help create soccer programs worldwide; served as head coach for the Trinidad and Tobago national team; was an assistant coach of the U.S. Women's National Team; and was the founder of Soccer Academy. Jillian's brother, Paul Ellis, is also a soccer coach; was head coach for a regional youth team and an assistant coach at George Mason University; and currently works full-time at Soccer Academy Inc.[4]

Honors[edit]

  • Third-Team All-American in 1987 at College of William and Mary

Managerial honors[edit]

Collegiate

As assistant coach of N.C. State Wolfpack:[4]

As head coach of UCLA Bruins:[4]

United States Women

As coach of youth teams:[4]

  • Nordic Cup title at Germany 2000 under-21 tournament
  • 2010 under-20 CONCACAF title

As assistant coach of senior team:[4]

  • Beijing 2008 Olympic Gold medal

References[edit]

Match reports