Jim Coode

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Jim Coode
No. 60
Date of birth: (1951-10-22)October 22, 1951
Place of birth: Mayfield Heights, Ohio
Date of death: June 1987 (age 35)
Career information
CFL status: International
Position(s): OT
Height: 6 ft 4 in (193 cm)
Weight: 260 lb (120 kg)
College: Michigan
NFL Draft: 1974 / Round: 7 / Pick: 173
Drafted by: Atlanta Falcons
Organizations
As player:
19741980 Ottawa Rough Riders
Career highlights and awards
CFL All-Star: 1978
CFL East All-Star: 1976, 1978
Awards: 1978 - CFL's Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman Award
1980 - Tom Pate Memorial Award
Honors: 1976 - Grey Cup champion
Retired #s: Ottawa Rough Riders #60

James "Jim" Coode (October 22, 1951 – June 1987) was an American football and Canadian football player. He played college football for the University of Michigan from 1970 to 1973 and professional football for the Detroit Wheels (two games in 1974) and the Ottawa Rough Riders (1974–1980). He was diagnosed with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in 1979 and died in 1987.

University of Michigan[edit]

A native of Mayfield Heights, Ohio, Coode enrolled at the University of Michigan in 1969 and played college football as an offensive tackle for Bo Schembechler's Michigan Wolverines football teams from 1970 to 1973.[1][2] As a junior, he started every game at left tackle for the 1972 Michigan Wolverines football team that compiled a 10-1 record and was ranked No. 6 in the final AP Poll.[3] As a senior, he started nine games at right tackle for the undefeated 1973 Michigan Wolverines football team that compiled a 10–0–1 record and was ranked No. 6 in the final AP Poll.[4]

Professional football[edit]

Coode began his professional football career in 1974 with the Detroit Wheels of the World Football League (WFL). He left the Wheels after playing two games when the team was unable to pay its players.[5]

After leaving the WFL, Coode joined the Ottawa Rough Riders of the Canadian Football League (CFL) at the end of September 1974.[5] played professional football for seven seasons in the Canadian Football League (CFL) as an offensive lineman for the Ottawa Rough Riders. He was a part of the Rough Riders' Grey Cup victory in 1976. He won the CFL's Most Outstanding Offensive Lineman Award in 1978 and the Tom Pate Memorial Award for community service in 1980. His jersey (#60) has been retired by the Rough Riders.[6] Coode was diagnosed with ALS in 1979 and appeared in four games for the Rough Riders in 1980 after the diagnosis.[7][8]

Family and later years[edit]

Coode was married to Lisa Coode, and they had a son, Jamie.[9] Coode continued to live in Ottawa after retiring from football. A tribute dinner for Coode in May 1983 drew 1,200 persons.[10] Bo Schembechler spoke at the tribute.[11] By December 1986, Coode's weight had dropped from 275 pounds to 130 pounds.[9] Coode died in June 1987.[12]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Michigan Football Roster Database". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  2. ^ "Goody, Goody Bo's Got Coode". Owosso Argus-Press. October 19, 1971. p. 16. 
  3. ^ "1972 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  4. ^ "1973 Football Team". University of Michigan, Bentley Historical Library. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  5. ^ a b "Coode in Camp". The Citizen, Ottawa. October 1, 1974. p. 21. 
  6. ^ "Ottawa Football Retired Numbers". Ottawa Red Blacks. Retrieved March 10, 2015. 
  7. ^ "Ottawa club due for wholesale changes next season". The Citizen, Ottawa. November 10, 1980. p. 25. 
  8. ^ "The Quiet Man, Jim Coode, goes unnoticed". The Citizen, Ottawa. June 9, 1980. p. 17. 
  9. ^ a b Earl McRae (December 12, 1986). "Jim Coode still the same inside". The Citizen, Ottawa. p. C1. 
  10. ^ "Special town honors special person in Jim Coode". The Citizen, Ottawa. May 4, 1983. p. 45. 
  11. ^ "1,200 pay tribute to 'great man'". The Citizen, Ottawa. May 4, 1983. p. 45. 
  12. ^ Gord Holder (September 4, 2014). "Ice Bucket Challenge evokes memories of former Riders". Ottawa Citizen.