Jim McLaughlin (coach)

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For other people named Jim McLaughlin, see James McLaughlin.
Jim McLaughlin
Personal information
Born (1960-11-18) November 18, 1960 (age 54)
Malibu, California, U.S.
Hometown Malibu, California, U.S.
College(s) UC Santa Barbara
Coaching information
Current team Washington (HC)
women's volleyball
Previous teams coached
Years Teams
1986–1989
1990–1996
1996
1997–2000
2001–present
Pepperdine (men's asst.)
USC (men's HC)
Notre Dame (women's asst.)
Kansas State (women's HC)
Washington (women's HC)
Last updated: September 19, 2014

Jim McLaughlin (born November 18, 1960 in Malibu, California)[1] is an American volleyball coach. He is currently in his 14th season as head coach of the women's volleyball team at the University of Washington in Seattle. During his time at UW, McLaughlin has become one of the most successful and respected coaches in the country and instituted a value system that has produced wins year-in and year-out, turning the Huskies into one of the nation’s elite volleyball programs.

The McLaughlin era has so far produced one national championship, four Final Four appearances (most recently in 2013), six trips to the Elite Eight, two national players of the year, three Pac-12 (formerly the Pac-10) Conference titles, and 13 players that combined for 28 AVCA All-America awards. McLaughlin was named the 2004 NCAA National Coach of the Year and received the 2002, 2004, 2005, and 2013 Pac-12 Coach of the Year awards.

Before Washington, he spent seven seasons as the men's head coach at USC, where he won the 1990 national championship and finished as runner-up in 1991, followed by a four-year run in the Big 12 Conference leading the women's program at Kansas State.

Through the 2013 season, McLaughlin had a 326-87 (.789) record with the Huskies in 13 seasons.

Collegiate career[edit]

McLaughlin attended Santa Monica Junior College (1980–81), where he played volleyball for two years and transferred to UC Santa Barbara (1982–83). He was the Gauchos' starting setter for two seasons, earning honorable mention All-America honors as a senior.

Head coach[edit]

Southern California[edit]

McLaughlin was the head coach for the USC Trojans men's volleyball team for seven seasons. In his first year as head coach in 1990, he led the Trojans to the NCAA Men's Volleyball Championship match, defeating Long Beach State, and finished as runner-up the following year. While at USC, McLaughlin's teams were ranked in the top 10 five times, while 15 players earned All-America accolades, led by two-time national player of the year Bryan Ivie.

Kansas State[edit]

McLaughlin spent four seasons building the Kansas State women's program into a national power; he compiled an 82-43 (.656) record and took the Wildcats to four consecutive NCAA tournaments. In his final season, McLaughlin led Kansas State to a 22-9 (.710) record, a program-best No. 16 national ranking and its first-ever trip to the NCAA Sweet 16, before losing to top-seeded Wisconsin.

During his tenure in Manhattan, two Wildcats earned All-America honors, seven were named to the All-Big 12 first team and 15 garnered first-team academic all-conference accolades. McLaughlin also was honored as the 1999 Big 12 Conference Coach of the Year.

Washington[edit]

When McLaughlin took over the Washington program in 2001, the team was last in the Pac-10 Conference. In his first year at UW, he led the Huskies to an 11-16 record and a 4-14 mark in the Pac-10. The team's 11 wins in 2001 were the most for the program since 1997. Just one year later, the Huskies went 20-11 and made the NCAA second round. Since 2003, Washington has not won fewer than 23 matches or lost more than nine in any season.[2]

In 2004, the Huskies won their first-ever Pac-10 title, and McLaughlin earned his first AVCA National Coach of the Year honor. In his fifth year at UW in 2005, he led Washington to its first-ever NCAA Women's Volleyball Championship and a 32-1 (.970) record as Washington swept all six of their matches in the tournament,[3] including top-ranked Nebraska in the final at the Alamodome in San Antonio.[4] McLaughlin was named the Pac-10 Coach of the Year, and made history as the first coach in NCAA history to win a national championship in both men and women's volleyball, having led the USC men's team to a national title in 1990.[5]

In 2006, he led UW to its third straight national semifinal, but the Dawgs fell to runner-up Stanford.[6][7]

The NCAA Championships were hosted in Seattle at KeyArena at Seattle Center in 2013. The Huskies, led by AVCA National Player of the Year and Honda Award Winner Krista Vansant, won the Pac-12 title and reached the Final Four, but fell in straight sets in the semifinals to eventual national champion Penn State.[8][9]

In his 13 years as head coach, McLaughlin has established Washington volleyball as a championship-caliber team. Washington has made an appearance in the NCAA Tournament every year except in his first year in 2001 and boasts a .789 winning percentage. There have been 51 players that have been honored with All-Conference selections, 50 Academic All-Conference honorees, 31 All-Americans and 8 Academic All-Americans since McLaughlin’s arrival.[10]

Quick facts[edit]

  • .789 winning percentage at UW (through 2013)
  • 31 All-Americans
  • 51 All-Conference selections
  • 50 Academics All-Conference honorees
  • 24 Professional Players produced
  • 12 Straight NCAA Tournament appearances
  •   8 Academic All-Americans
  •   4 Final Four Appearances
  •   1 National Championship

Head coaching record[edit]

Men's college volleyball[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
USC Trojans (WIVA/MPSF) (1990–1996)
1990 USC 26–7 12–4 T-2nd NCAA Champion
1991 USC 34–2 16–0 1st NCAA Finals
1992 USC 11–13 9–7 3rd
1993 USC 18–2 11–8 T-3rd
1994 USC 18–2 11–8 T-3rd
1995 USC 23–8 14–5 2nd
1996 USC 14–16 9–10 5th
USC: 142-65 (.686) 79–45 (.637)
Total: 142–65 (.686)

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

Women's college volleyball[edit]

Season Team Overall Conference Standing Postseason
Kansas State Wildcats (Big 12 Conference) (1997–2000)
1997 Kansas State 20–13 11–9 6th NCAA First Round
1998 Kansas State 19–12 12–8 5th NCAA Second Round
1999 Kansas State 21–9 14–6 4th NCAA Second Round
2000 Kansas State 22–9 14–6 T-2nd NCAA Third Round
Kansas State: 82-43 (.656) 51–29 (.638)
Washington Huskies (Pac-10/12 Conference) (2001–present)
2001 Washington 11–16 4–14 8th
2002 Washington 20–11 9–9 T-5th NCAA Second Round
2003 Washington 23–9 10–8 T-5th NCAA Quarterfinals
2004 Washington 28–3 16–2 1st NCAA Semifinals
2005 Washington 32–1 16–1 2nd NCAA Champion
2006 Washington 29–5 15–3 T-2nd NCAA Semifinals
2007 Washington 27–4 15–3 2nd NCAA Second Round
2008 Washington 27–5 15–3 2nd NCAA Quarterfinals
2009 Washington 24–6 13–5 T-2nd NCAA Second Round
2010 Washington 24–9 10–8 5th NCAA Quarterfinals
2011 Washington 24–8 15–7 T-4th NCAA Second Round
2012 Washington 25–7 14–6 T-4th NCAA Third Round
2013 Washington 30–3 18–2 1st NCAA Semifinals
Washington: 326-87 (.789) 170–61 (.736)
Total: 408–130 (.758)

      National champion  
      Conference regular season champion         Conference regular season and conference tournament champion
      Division regular season champion       Division regular season and conference tournament champion
      Conference tournament champion

  • Final Pac-10 season was 2010; became Pac-12 in 2011

Awards and honors[edit]

  • 2013 – Pac-12 Coach of the Year
  • 2005 – Pac-10 Coach of the Year
  • 2004 – AVCA National Coach of the Year, AVCA Pacific Region Coach of the Year, Pac-10 Coach of the Year
  • 2002 – Pac-10 Coach of the Year
  • 1999 – Big 12 Coach of the Year

Personal[edit]

Jim is married to the former Margaret Jarc, a four-year soccer monogram winner at the University of Notre Dame. They have three daughters, Megan, Molly, and Marit.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Wood, Terry (2005-12-15). "Q&A with Washington head coach Jim McLaughlin". The Seattle Times. Retrieved 2008-08-06. 
  2. ^ http://www.gohuskies.com/sports/w-volley/mtt/mclaughlin_jim00.html
  3. ^ Wood, Terry (December 17, 2006). "Volleyball Notes: Huskies aim to launch a legacy". Seattle Times. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  4. ^ Wood, Terry (December 18, 2006). "Bump, set, champs! Huskies stun No. 1 Cornhuskers". Seattle Times. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  5. ^ 2005 season in review
  6. ^ Hamann, Jack (December 15, 2006). "Volleyball: Stanford sweeps UW". Seattle Times. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  7. ^ Washington blitzed by Stanford in national semifinal
  8. ^ Evans, Jayda (December 20, 2013). "Huskies’ Krista Vansant is national player of the year". Retrieved September 19, 2013. 
  9. ^ Stone, Larry (December 18, 2013). "With UW in Final Four at KeyArena, we’re a city rabid for volleyball". Seattle Times. Retrieved September 19, 2014. 
  10. ^ http://grfx.cstv.com/photos/schools/wash/sports/w-volley/auto_pdf/2012-13/misc_non_event/record-book.pdf

External links[edit]