Jim Pollock

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Jim Pollock
Ontario MPP
In office
1981–1990
Preceded by Dave Hobson
Succeeded by Elmer Buchanan
Constituency Hastings—Peterborough
Personal details
Born (1930-07-08) July 8, 1930 (age 84)
Political party Progressive Conservative
Occupation Farmer

Jim Pollock (born July 8, 1930) is a former politician in Ontario, Canada. He was a Progressive Conservative member of the Legislative Assembly of Ontario from 1981 to 1990.

Background[edit]

Pollock was educated at Rawdon High School, and worked as a farmer before entering politics. He was a reeve of Rawdon Township, and a Warden in the County of Hastings. Pollock was also an active freemason.

Politics[edit]

He was elected to the Ontario legislature in the 1981 provincial election, defeating Liberal Dave Hobson by just under 3,000 votes in the riding of Hastings—Peterborough.[1] Elmer Buchanan of the NDP finished third. Pollock was a backbench supporter of Premiers Bill Davis and Frank Miller in the parliaments which followed. In 1983, he brought forward a resolution to make the blue jay the official bird of Ontario.

The Progressive Conservatives lost power following the 1985 election, although Pollock actually increased his majority.[2] He was one of only sixteen Progressive Conservatives re-elected in the 1987 election, defeating Liberal Carman Metcalfe and Elmer Buchanan of the NDP.[3]

The Progressive Conservatives made a modest recovery in the 1990 provincial election, although Pollock lost his seat to Buchanan amid a provincial majority government victory for the NDP. Buchanan won the election by 896 votes.[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Canadian Press (March 20, 1981). "Winds of change, sea of security". The Windsor Star (Windsor, Ontario). p. 22. Retrieved 2014-04-01. 
  2. ^ "Results of vote in Ontario election". The Globe and Mail. May 3, 1985. p. 13. 
  3. ^ "Results from individual ridings". The Windsor Star. September 11, 1987. p. F2. 
  4. ^ "Ontario election: Riding-by-riding voting results". The Globe and Mail. September 7, 1990. p. A12. 

External links[edit]